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Free research essays on topics related to: workplace

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  • Positive Changes In The Workplace - 1,255 words
    "Hi ho, hi ho, it's off to work we go." So sang the charmingly quirky dwarfs in Disney's Snow White. In many ways they stood for the hopes of mid-century Americans: Hold down a secure job, produce your share of goods or products, do what the boss says, go with the program, and earn enough to support a comfortable lifestyle for yourself and your family. Things haven't really changed all that much--or have they? Only a few of us are currently involved in any type of manual labor or production. In fact, more than 80% of the workforce is in a service position according to most of the information we receive in our Human Resource office. In the past 100 years, the tools of the trade have changed d ...
    Related: positive effects, workplace, virtual reality, leadership challenge, video
  • Positive Changes In The Workplace - 1,224 words
    ... l the mastodons and live for another season. We really have not changed all that much. Today's workplace requires us to give our best as often as possible. James Kouzes feels that "Opportunities to challenge the status quo and introduce change opens the doors to doing one's best. Challenge is the motivation environment for excellence (Kouzes, Posner 39)". The only exception that needs to be brought out by that is that we need to give people a change to get used to the changes before we introduce more. The major reason for stress is when you do not allow for the adjustment period in-between major changes. " Stress has gotten a bad name. Stress of all kinds is good ----- physical, emotiona ...
    Related: workplace, workplace employees, generation x, customer satisfaction, flexible
  • Diversity In The Workplace - 1,141 words
    Workplace Diversity: Fact or Fiction? Are todays corporate diversity programs truly effective? That question, posed by Robert J Grossman in an article carried by the Wall Street Journal Online on June 28, 2000, will be explored as part of the review of Mr. Grossmans article. The concept of diversity goes well beyond the historical employment equity legislation enacted in both federal and local jurisdictions. It calls for the recognition of the contributions that individuals can make as individuals, not just as members of legislatively designated groups. It calls for management of organizations to be totally inclusive, not just tolerating those who are different but celebrating those differen ...
    Related: diversity, diversity in the workplace, managing diversity, workplace, workplace diversity
  • Collective Bargaining In The Workplace - 2,201 words
    ... ely presumed not to have been intended by the parties to be a legally contract unless the agreement - (b) contains a provision which (however expressed) states that the parties intend that the agreement shall be a legally (2) Any collective agreement which does satisfy these conditions in subsection (1)(a) and (b) above shall be conclusively presumed to have been intended by the parties to be a legally enforceable There are four main advantages claimed for the legal enforcement of (a) collective agreements would have to become both more comprehensive and more precise in defining the rights and obligations of each party if their meaning and intend is to be capable of legal interpretation ...
    Related: bargaining, collective, collective bargaining, workplace, different levels
  • Ethics In The Workplace - 980 words
    PORTFOLIO FOR CONTEMPORARY ETHICS AND ETHICS AND THE BUSINESS PROFESSIONAL II. EVIDENCE CASE STUDY # 1 IMMORALE ACTS 2 CASE STUDY # 2 FRATERNAZATION 3 CASE STUDY # 4 SKIPPING WORK 6 CASE STUDY # 5 BUSINESS ETHICS 7 OTHER RESOURCES 8 I feel that I have acquired enough knowledge and experience throughout my lifetime to be awarded credit for an ethics course. People deal with ethical questions throughout their lives and gain experience more valuable than any case study in a semester course. Since most ethics classes would teach via example for my evidence I will present several case studies of ethical dilemmas I have personally encountered in my workplace and in my life. I feel through the cour ...
    Related: business ethics, ethics, workplace, ethical dilemma, decision making
  • Ethics In The Workplace - 1,011 words
    ... feteria manger can take the proper security measures to monitor the customers. One day Chris starts working at his local grocery store as a night stock clerk. His new supervisor Shane is an unusual person and is showing him the types of tasks he will be doing. Soon its lunchtime and Shane is looking for something for lunch. Shane asks Chris if hes going to get anything. Chris tells him he brought lunch from home. Shane says well you dont need to do that anymore because we get lunch for free around here. Chris asks, well how exactly do we do that? Shane replies well check this out and he grabs something from the frozen food section and drops in on the ground and then steps on it. Whoops t ...
    Related: business ethics, ethics, workplace, state college, military training
  • Motivation In The Workplace - 1,293 words
    One of the most important things to learn in for human relations are: The answer rests on an understanding of what motivation is all about, for it is motivated workers who ultimately get things done, and without such people no organization can hope to What motivates an individual to act in a given way? Motives: needs, drives, wants, or impulses within the Regardless of how we define motives; however, motive arouse and maintain activity as well as determine the general direction of an individual's behavior. Motives are classified in two categories: Primary: motives that are unlearned. Ex: the need for food and shelter. Secondary: motives that are learned. Ex: the need for power, achievement ...
    Related: motivation, workplace, interpersonal behavior, highly effective, verification
  • Diversity In Workplace - 1,034 words
    iversity in the Workplace How Different Cultures Helped Shape Our Nation Diversity in the Workplace How Different Cultures Helped Shape Our Nation Today the United States of America is regarded as a global economic leader. The standard of living in the U.S. is higher than that of most other nations. Our nation is considered an economic super-power. Economic needs have often caused Americans to seek immigrants as workers, and economic opportunities have attracted foreigners. The United States is a nation of immigrants. Our nation has been shaped by successive waves of immigrants who have played major roles in our changing economy. The overwhelming majority of immigrants who enter the United ...
    Related: diversity, diversity in the workplace, workplace, economic growth, colonial america
  • Diversity In The Workplace - 741 words
    A diverse workforce is composed of individuals of both sexes and of many races, ethic groups, religion, physical and mental abilities. Before, we thought of diversity as the total number of minority and women in the company, similar to affirmative Action. Today, companies need diversity at every level where decisions are made. The role of a manager is to create an environment where the uniqueness of each employee is maximized. According to the August 1994 issue of Fortune, human resource estimate that only 3%- 5% of the US corporations are diversifying their workforce effectively. The article continued by estimating in the millennium, nearly 85% of the 2.5 million entering the labor pool wil ...
    Related: diversity, diversity in the workplace, human diversity, workforce diversity, workplace
  • Women In The Workplace - 908 words
    The emergence of an urban, industrialized society affected the lives of American women in the late nineteenth century. Women during this time were beginning to see that not only did they belong in the home, but they could also find a role in the workplace. Men, on the other hand, maintained their role in the job market. However, the jobs of both men and women in the nineteenth become more and more specialized in their nature. Women in the 1800s were searching for jobs that had typically been done by men. These jobs included office work and factory work. As women searching for work found, the jobs they wanted to obtain were not there. Men, or other women who had started the search earlier had ...
    Related: american women, century women, men and women, women today, workplace
  • Violence In The Workplace - 1,488 words
    A 16-year-old female restaurant employee is raped by her assistant manager. An old employee who was downsized shoots a 55-year-old engineer. Yearly 1 million Americans are victims of violence while working (Black, p2). Four American are murdered on the job everyday. Everyday millions of Americans leave their homes to began their workday, however some do not always return. The workplace is becoming a common ground for violence. The U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics estimates that more than 2 million people each year become victims of violent crimes at work, (Jarman 1). Thus, making the workplace homicide the fastest growing form of murder. Violence on the job can appear in many forms from sim ...
    Related: domestic violence, school violence, workplace, workplace violence, cultural values
  • Inequality In The Workplace - 1,041 words
    Is it fair that men make more money than women do, even though they both have the same qualifications? Is it fair that women are less likely than men to get promoted are? Is it fair that women start at lower positions in the work place than men do? Discrimination in the work place is hindering gender relations in todays modern society. Women are getting fed up with always being treated unfairly by the employers. They feel that employers should base their decision on who can do the better job, not who is the male and who is the female. Hiring, promotion, and salaries are the three main factors that separate the men from the women in the work place. In hiring, men are much more likely to get a ...
    Related: inequality, workplace, power movement, wage gap, ceos
  • Control In The Workplace - 1,123 words
    The roles of managers as leaders within a firm require them to plan future economic objectives for the firm to reach. However in order to achieve these plans, control is needed to ensure that workplace compliance and high levels of efficiency are achieved. Through control, management are able to establish processes, implement them and if necessary redesign them. This essay will introduce key management theories from the likes of Frederick Winslow Taylor, Henri Fayol and Max Weber and discuss how these theories help to enforce workplace compliance. (Allen, Gemmy) Frederick Winslow Taylor was the creator of scientific management. As an adolescent, Taylor was known for his counting and measurin ...
    Related: management control, workplace, max weber, frederick winslow taylor, cooperation
  • Control In The Workplace - 1,083 words
    ... les in the method of payment: assurance of fair remuneration that encourages keenness by rewarding well-directed effort and it shall not lead to over-payment going beyond reasonable limits. 8. Centralisation. Part of the 'natural order', Fayol considered that an element of centralisation must always be present. He regarded the debate between centralisation and decentralisation to be one which had no exact solution. 9. Scalar chain (line of authority). The unity of command can lead to tangled chains of authority which hinder communication. Hierarchic organisations regularly demanded that departments communicate with each other only through their heads. This meant that the volume of work h ...
    Related: workplace, oxford university, rapid change, new york, reward
  • The Value Of Privacy In The Workplace - 1,037 words
    Privacy. There seems to be no legal issue today that cuts so wide a swath through conflicts confronting American society: from AIDS tests to wiretaps, polygraph test to computerized data bases, the common denominator has been whether the right to privacy outweighs other concerns of society" This quote from Robert Ellis Smith explains, in one sentence, the absolute need to ensure privacy in the workplace. One of the most interesting, yet controversial, areas concerning public personnel is employee privacy. What limits are there to employers intrusions into, and control over, employees behaviors and personal properties? There are five major areas which trigger privacy matters in the area of pu ...
    Related: communications privacy, invasion of privacy, privacy, right to privacy, workplace
  • The Value Of Privacy In The Workplace - 1,030 words
    ... rms of whether the person had an expectation of privacy in the situation which the state singles out for intrusion. The monitoring by the employer of employee conversations in lounges during work breaks would most assuredly be regarded as a monitoring of behaviors outside the employer's sphere of interest. The heightened expectation of privacy attached to oral conversations is recognized in legislation like the Federal Wiretap Act, which prohibits both private and public employers from intercepting and recording the "wire communications" of employees. It is the conversation which is protected. For instance, employers may use cameras to observe employees and to provide security. But provi ...
    Related: privacy, privacy protection, privacy rights, workplace, work environment
  • Effects Of Stress And Balancing Stress In The Workplace - 1,780 words
    1. Introduction Stress is a very complex phenomenon. It is very much a personal condition and individuals vary in their ability to cope with different forms and levels of stress. In fact we all need some level of stress, as stimulus, to get going and live (Green 1993). However, higher levels of stress can greatly affect individual and organisational performance. It is not a stress-free environment that organisations and individuals need to aim for at work but a stress-controlled one, which is beneficial for everybody. It is important for organisations to recognise this and apply appropriate methods and processes to reduce stress. Creation of an inclusive, participative, inspirational and res ...
    Related: balancing, beneficial effects, job stress, managing stress, occupational stress, reduce stress, stress management
  • Workplace Diversity - 1,040 words
    Needs, values and priorities of employees and employers have changed dramatically over the last decade. On all rungs of the corporate ladder, men and women are seeking new ways to manage the time they spend working so they can spend more time living. In the boardrooms, executives are seeking ways to attract - and retain - the best employees so they can continue to survive and thrive in a highly competitive global economy. Interestingly enough, solutions to the changing needs and priorities of both groups are being found in the same place: flexible work arrangements are proving to be a win-win strategy in today's leading-edge organizations. The 1990's have witnessed dramatic change in the att ...
    Related: diversity, workplace, workplace diversity, customer satisfaction, quality of life
  • Workplace Diversity - 1,043 words
    ... off, and even an increase in productivity when flexible work arrangements are used properly. In general, productivity improvements are credited to the higher energy that comes from reduced stress or better morale; improved quality of work; more focus on task rather than time; and extended service with the same number of employees. Flexibility creates a more responsive organization. Companies continually face challenges, be it a departmental "baby boomlet", recruitment for a particular job classification, or external pressures like the introduction of new technologies or the onset of a recession. Managers must be able to respond creatively with policies that are already in place before a ...
    Related: diversity, workplace, workplace diversity, work life balance, fair labor standards act
  • Stress Management In The International Workplace - 1,306 words
    In the context of a burgeoning economy and the growing influence of "Americanised" work cultures and practices in a number of workplaces, stress at work has increased in Ireland in recent years. The management of workplace stress is thus an important contemporary issue in 2001. Recent research indicates that deficiencies in the management and organization of work are the main causes of stress at work, and that workplace stress may have a number of negative consequences for workers and employers, including: physical and mental illness; chronic absenteeism; increased labor turnover; and reduced morale, motivation and productivity. While Ireland's much-vaunted "Celtic Tiger" economy continues t ...
    Related: management, management control, stress management, stress reduction, workplace
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