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  • A Trip To The New York City - 491 words
    The trip took me to the New York City, what a wonderful place! Great City and Very Busy! I've seen busy people, busy street, towering buildings and a lot more. Great cultural diversity, wonderful food (of all varieties), anything you want and more. I had a wonderful experience. I enjoyed every minute of it. I was very impressed with what I saw. I passed through Times Square, then "the Empire State Building, a giant building. And I went straight to the very known Fifth Avenue to enjoy the excitement of Rockefeller Center. There I saw the biggest and nicest Christmas tree in NY. The fifth very is a very interesting place from where many shops and the city and its people impressed me a lot. Mor ...
    Related: new york, york city, united states of america, fifth avenue, impressed
  • The Architecture Of New York City - 821 words
    During the end of the colonial period, architectural styles became more based on ancient Roman and Greek buildings. The style coincided with the American Revolution, thus the neoclassical style became very closely identified with the political values of the young America. Presidents George Washington and Thomas Jefferson gave serious thought to architecture because they were deeply involved with the planning and building preparations of Washington, D.C. Both Statesman looked to the classical world as their best source of inspiration. Jeffersons conception of the Roman ideas of beauty and proportion were elegantly expressed in his design for the Virginia State Capitol at Richmond. The new nat ...
    Related: american architecture, architecture, new york, york city, european society
  • New York City - 667 words
    New York City is one of my favorite places to visit. Out there on the streets, it is possible to feel absolute freedom. Living in America is a fantastic privilege; living in New York City is something further even better. As you stagger up those stairs to the city streets and you capture that first breath of city air, you declare to yourself, this is freedom! The buildings are so astonishingly tall and eye-catching. These buildings encompass the most distinctive architecture ever invented. There are so many buildings in New York City that people find it hard to believe that man is capable of putting them up, but on the other hand also knocking them down. The buildings look like they had plun ...
    Related: new york, york city, little italy, chinese food, restaurants
  • Aids - 611 words
    My cousin Christopher was 16 years old when he died. Christopher had been fighting the disease known as AIDS throughout his life, and I didnt know. I had always known when I was young that Christopher was sick in some way. His right hand was malformed and he had to receive a variety of injections each day from his mother. But as young as I was, I was never afraid of Chris or his sickness. Chris and I were friends as much as we were family. We would play spies together and hide on his steps as we watched our parents play cards. To me, Chris was a normal child who just needed some extra medicine. But after his death, I learned that his condition was much more serious then it appeared to be. Th ...
    Related: aids, cerebral palsy, school district, york city, aunt
  • Fdrs Influence As President - 2,006 words
    Some have called him the best president yet. Others have even claimed that he was the world's most influential and successful leader of the twentieth century. Those claims can be backed up by the overwhelming support that he received from his citizens throughout his four terms in office. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt began a new era in American history by ending the Great Depression that the country had fallen into in 1929. His social reforms gave people a new perspective on government. Government was not only expected to protect the people from foreign invaders, but to protect against poverty and joblessness. Roosevelt had shown his military and diplomatic skill as the Commander in Ch ...
    Related: fdrs, president franklin, president franklin delano roosevelt, president harry, president harry truman, president hoover, president john
  • Reconstruction - 1,015 words
    Victoria Hubble February 8, 2000 Reconstruction The Reconstruction, a time most people would call a rebirth, succeeded in few of the goals that it had set out to achieve within the 12 years it was in progress. It was the reconstructions failure in its objectives, that brought forth the inevitable success in changing the South, as well as the countless African Americans living in it as well as the countless African Americans living in it at the time. There were three goals the reconstruction set, and failed to achieve, as well as emphasizing the profound effect it had on the south, and an entire race. In the South the Reconstruction period was a time of readjustment accompanied by disorder. S ...
    Related: reconstruction, reconstruction period, american history, civil war, stating
  • Astor John Jacob - 549 words
    John Jacob Astor lived through1763-1848. He was a fur trader, businessman, and real estate investor. Astor began life as one of twelve children of a poor German butcher and died the richest man in America. The making of a great fortune was the aim and purpose of Astor's life, and he accomplished it by dominating the American fur trade and investing his profits in the real estate of burgeoning New York City. Shortly before his death, Astor was asked if he would have done anything differently with his life. He is supposed to have replied that his only regret was not having bought all of Manhattan. Astor was born in the small town of Waldorf, near Heidelberg, Germany. At twenty he followed his ...
    Related: jacob, real estate, louisiana purchase, york public library, operating
  • None Provided - 1,727 words
    World War Two was a terrible and destructive war. Although many dynamics led to the advent of World War Two, the catalyst of the Second World War was actually the aftermath of the First World War. The First World War's aftermath set the stage for the rise of Hitler. On Nov. 11, 1918, an armistice was signed by the German commanders in the railcar of the French commander, Ferdinand Foch, ending the actual combat of World War One. The debacle of the First World War, which killed between 10 to 13 million people, demanded retribution. The Allies needed to draw up a treaty which formally ended hostilities between the Allies and the Central Powers. This treaty, which was called the Treaty of Versa ...
    Related: adolph hitler, multimedia encyclopedia, united states, treaty, considerable
  • American Immigration - 613 words
    In the decades following the Civil War, the United States emerged as an industrial giant. Old industries expanded and many new ones, including petroleum refining, steel manufacturing, and electrical power, emerged. Railroads expanded significantly, bringing even remote parts of the country into a national market economy. America was the ideal place. In the late 1800s, people in many parts of the world decided to leave their homes and immigrate to the United States. Fleeing crop failure, a shortage in land, and employment, rising taxes, and famine, many came to the U. S. because it was perceived as the land of economic opportunity. Others came seeking personal freedom or relief from political ...
    Related: american, american immigration, american society, immigration, physical abuse
  • Mark Twain - 1,447 words
    MARK TWAIN a.k.a. Samuel Langhorne Clemens "Mark Twain, which is a pseudonym for Samuel Langhorne Clemens, was born in 1835, and died in 1910. He was an american writer and humorist. Maybe one of the reasons Twain will be remembered is because his writings contained morals and positive views. Because Twain's writing is so descriptive, people look to his books for realistic interpretations of places, for his memorable characters, and his ability to describe his hatred for hypocrisy and oppression. HE believed he could write. Most authors relied on other people and what they said, but because Twain was so solitary, he made himself so successful. 1" "When he was younger, his family moved. When ...
    Related: mark twain, twain, public school, american literature, steamboat
  • Architecture And Burials In The Maya And Aztec - 1,170 words
    Plundering and carnage were the overlying results of the Spanish conquest of MesoAmerica beginning in 1519. The ensuing years brought many new "visitors," mostly laymen or officials in search of wealth, though the Christianity toting priest was ever present. Occasionally a man from any of these classes, though mainly priests would be so in awe of the civilization they were single handedly massacring that they began to observe and document things such as everyday life, religious rituals, economic goings on, and architecture, which was the biggest achievement in the eyes of the Spaniards. That is how the accounts of Friar Diego de Landa, a priest, were created, giving us rare first per-son his ...
    Related: architecture, aztec, maya, more important, food and drink
  • City - 1,332 words
    Cities exist for many reasons and the diversity of urban form and function can be traced to the complex roles that cities perform. Cities serve as centers of storage, commerce, and industry. The agricultural surplus from the surrounding country hinterland is processed and distributed within the city. Urban areas have also developed around marketplaces, where imported goods from distant places could be exchanged for the local products. Throughout history, cities have been founded at the intersections of transportation routes, or at points where market goods must shift from one mode of transportation to another such as river or ocean ports as well as railways. Cities are also sites of enormous ...
    Related: york city, urban neighborhoods, united states, thomas more, terrestrial
  • Georgia Okeffee - 1,987 words
    Georgia Totto O'Keeffe was born in the year on November 15, 1887. She was one of seven children. O'Keeffe's aunt was mostly responsible for raising her. O'Keeffe did not care much for her aunt though; she once referred to her as, "the headache of my life." She did, however, have some respect for her aunt's strict and self disciplined character. O'Keeffe was given her own room and less responsibility. The younger sisters had to do more chores and share close living conditions. A younger sister stated that O'Keeffe always wanted things her way, and if she didn't get them her way, "she'd raise the devil." It was found through family and friends that O'Keeffe was like this throughout much of her ...
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  • Andy Warhol - 1,693 words
    The pop art movement began in London during the 1950's and then quickly spread throughout nearly all of the industrialized world. Although the artists did have some overlapping styles, pop art focuses more on the subject and less on style, which was left up to each individual artist. The main themes that is evident in all pop art revolves around modern social values. The style in which these values were portrayed varied depending on the culture and artist. Critic Barbara Rose claimed in her review of a Pop Art show that Pop Art, " I wish to disagree with the assumption that pop art is an art style. It is not; these artists are linked only through their subject matter, not through stylistic s ...
    Related: andy, andy warhol, warhol, baby boom, music television
  • The Upper Room - 1,314 words
    When an artist displays a work of art in a public place such as Battery Park City, he or she must take into consideration the degree of interaction that may take place between the public and their work of art. When I spoke with the artist of The Upper Room, Ned Smyth, he explained his intention of the publics interaction with his sculpture was to be both physical and emotional. In this paper, I will discuss the different issues that have made his intent a success. First, I will address the impact that the physical appearance of the work has on the public, and why. The Upper Room is constructed from concrete with inlayed stone and glass mosaic. It is a large-scale sculpture, yet it is very we ...
    Related: places of worship, new york, personal growth, unusual, architecture
  • Elie Wiesel - 445 words
    Eliezer Wiesel was born in 1928, a native of Sighet, Transylvania (Romania) which is near the Ukrainian border; He grew up experiencing first-hand the horrors of the Holocaust, this started when at fifteen years old Wiesel and his family were deported by the Nazis to Auschwitz. His mother and younger sister perished there, his two older sisters survived. Wiesel and his father were later transported to Buchenwald In 1945, at the end of the war, Elie moved to Paris, where he studied literature, philosophy, and psychology at the Sorbonne. With a strong desire to write, Elie worked as a journalist in Paris before coming to the United States in 1956. He became an American citizen almost by accide ...
    Related: elie, elie wiesel, wiesel, legion of honor, yale university
  • Allen Ginsburg In America - 1,585 words
    Irwin Allen Ginsberg was born on June 3, 1926 in Newark, New Jeresy. Louis Ginsberg, Allens dad, was a published poet, a high school teacher and a Jewish Socialist. His wife, Naomi, was a radical Communist and nudist who went tragically insane in early adulthood. A shy and complicated child growing up in Paterson, New Jersey, Allen's home life was dominated by his mother's bizarre and frightening episodes. A severe paranoid, she trusted Allen when she was convinced the rest of the family and the world was plotting against her. As Allen tried to understand what was happening with his mother, he also had to struggle to comprehend what was happening inside him, because he was consumed by lust f ...
    Related: allen, allen ginsberg, america, punk rock, ken kesey
  • Fdrs Influence As President - 1,775 words
    Franklin Delano Roosevelts Influence as president Some have called him the best president yet. Others have even claimed that he was the world's most influential and successful leader of the twentieth century. Those claims can be backed up by the overwhelming support that he received from his citizens throughout his four terms in office. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt began a new era in American history by ending the Great Depression that the country had fallen into in 1929. His social reforms gave people a new perspective on government. Government was not only expected to protect the people from foreign invaders, but to protect against poverty and joblessness. Roosevelt had shown his mi ...
    Related: fdrs, president franklin, president franklin delano roosevelt, president harry, president harry truman, president hoover, vice president
  • Alexander Hamilton - 1,444 words
    Alexander Hamilton was born as a British subject on the island of Nevis in the West Indies on the 11th of January 1755. His father was James Hamilton, a Scottish merchant of St. Christopher. His grandfather was Alexander Hamilton, of Grange, Lanarkshire. One of his great grandfathers was Sir R. Pollock, the Laird of Cambuskeith. Hamilton's mother was Rachael Fawcette Levine, of French Huguenot descent. When she was very young, she married a Danish proprietor of St. Croix named John Michael Levine. Ms. Levine left her husband and was later divorced from him on June 25, 1759. Under Danish law, the (the court ordering the divorce) Ms. Levine was forbidden from remarrying. Thus, Hamilton's birth ...
    Related: alexander, alexander hamilton, hamilton, first continental congress, long island
  • Alexander Hamilton - 1,400 words
    ... epudiation. His Report on a National Bank, Dec. 13, 1790, advocated a private bank with semipublic functions and was patterned after the Bank of England. His Report on Manufacturers, 1791, itself entitles Hamilton to a position as an epoch economist. It was the first great revolt from Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations (1776). It, in part, argued for a system of moderate protective duties associated with a deliberate policy of promoting national interests. The inspirations from this work became England's official economic policy and remain the primary foundation of the German economic system. His masterly opinion on the implied powers of the Constitution persuaded Washington of the Constitut ...
    Related: alexander, alexander hamilton, hamilton, james madison, revolutionary war
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