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Free research essays on topics related to: nobel prize

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  • The Nobel Prize And Its First Laureates - 450 words
    Alfred Nobel was a Swedish industrialist, and inventor. In 1866 he invented dynamite, which made him very wealthy, but he left all of his money to establish a fund for the Nobel Prize. The Nobel Prize is awarded annually for achievements during the previous year, in the categories of physics, chemistry, medicine, or physiology, literature, and the promotion of peace. Each winner receives a set amount of prize money, a medal, and a certificate. The Nobel Prize was first awarded in 1901, by the bank of Sweden. Its first winners included Jean Henry Dunant, Frederic Passy, Emil Adolf von Behring, Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen, Jacobus Hendricus Vant Hoff, and Rene Francois Armand Prudhomme. Emil Adolf ...
    Related: alfred nobel, nobel, nobel prize, prize, red cross
  • Biography Of Nobel Prize Winner, Michael Smith - 613 words
    I was born on April 26th, 1932 in Blackpool, England. My childhood went by quickly. I was very bright in elementary school. My family wasnt to rich, so I didnt have the option to go to a private school. Luckily I earned a Scholarship to Arnold School. And although I didnt like my peers, I tried hard at school and I did well. I was not proficient in Latin and so was not able to go to Oxford or Cambridge. However, I did enter the first-rate chemistry honours program at the University of Manchester in 1950, where the professors were E.R.H. Jones and M.G. Evans, and graduated in 1953, with the financial support of a Blackpool Education Committee Scholarship. I had hoped to get a first-class degr ...
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  • History Of The Nobel Prize Foundation - 1,696 words
    The whole of my remaining realizable estate shall be dealt with in the following way: the capital, invested in safe securities by my executors, shall constitute a fund, the interest on which shall be annually distributed in the form of prizes to those who, during the preceding year, shall have conferred the greatest benefit on mankind. The said interest shall be divided into five equal parts, which shall be apportioned as follows: one part to the person who shall have made the most important discovery or invention within the field of physics; one part to the person who shall have made the most important chemical discovery or improvement; one part to the person who shall have made the most im ...
    Related: alfred nobel, ancient history, nobel, nobel prize, prize, roman history
  • History Of The Nobel Prize Foundation - 1,736 words
    ... nd comprehensive scholarship. Mommsen had the ability to combine his command of the vast material with stunning accuracy, a strict method of organization, a youthful vigor, and a method of presentation that almost creates an artful masterpiece and alone can give a solid foundation and life to a common description. It is hard to discern whether or not to praise him solely for his mastery of the topics that he writes about, or to love him for his talent to turn carefully investigated facts into a moving picture. He has been one of the first to bridge the gap between historian and writer. It is probably most notable his relation of the Romans obedience to the state as the system of obedienc ...
    Related: nobel, nobel prize, prize, nineteenth century, national anthem
  • Biography Of Nobel Prize Winner, William Butler Yeats - 550 words
    William Butler Yeats was not just an extremely well-known Nobel Prize winning author, he was a very influential Irishman in the political and social fields of the time. Although given much more credit for his poetry rather than the social groups which arose from his influence, he was very involved in society. Yeats was born near Dublin, Ireland in Silgo on June 13, 1865, into an Anglo-Irish Protestant family. He was educated at Dublin and London. During his education he studied art and writing. At the age of twenty-three, Yeats wrote his first book, and during 1888 he became madly entranced with a woman by the name of Maud Gonne. Although he asked for her hand in marriage on many different o ...
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  • Nobel Prize Nomination - 600 words
    In this paper I will discuss the Nobel Prize as a most popular and considerable nomination today. Also I will analyze Nobel Prize not as an abstract nomination but as an experience of people. So I want to find out about some particular winners while doing this paper. Because Nobel Prize has been created for people who just work persistently and have success doing that. In his 1985 will, Alfred Nobel, a Swedish industrialist who made his fortune by inventing and selling dynamite, left to posterity a sizable prize fund, stipulating that it be used each year to recognize those individuals "who shall have contributed most materially to benefit mankind." Today, the Nobel Prize is the most prestig ...
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  • Beck - 1,259 words
    Well in this short report on John Steinbeck I am about to include all of the work that I have done in this class Including my full report on one of his books, a little background on Mr. Steinbeck and many other things, All out of the mind and the computer of Jeremy Slaven. An American author and winner of the 1962 Nobel Prize for literature, John Ernst Steinbeck, Jr., b. Salinas, Calif., Feb. 27, 1902, d. Dec. 20, 1968, based most of his novels on the American experience, often with sympathetic focus on the poor, the eccentric, or the dispossessed. Steinbeck grew up in Salinas Valley, a rich agricultural area of Monterey County and the setting of many of his works, where he learned firsthand ...
    Related: beck, john steinbeck, public interest, burning bright, youngest
  • Elie Wiesel - 445 words
    Eliezer Wiesel was born in 1928, a native of Sighet, Transylvania (Romania) which is near the Ukrainian border; He grew up experiencing first-hand the horrors of the Holocaust, this started when at fifteen years old Wiesel and his family were deported by the Nazis to Auschwitz. His mother and younger sister perished there, his two older sisters survived. Wiesel and his father were later transported to Buchenwald In 1945, at the end of the war, Elie moved to Paris, where he studied literature, philosophy, and psychology at the Sorbonne. With a strong desire to write, Elie worked as a journalist in Paris before coming to the United States in 1956. He became an American citizen almost by accide ...
    Related: elie, elie wiesel, wiesel, legion of honor, yale university
  • Alber Einstein - 1,006 words
    Albert Einstein was a famous scientist, writer and professor. He was born in Ulm, Germany, on March 24,1879. As a child, Einstein wasn't like the other boys: he hated school but loved math. He was shy, and talked very slowly. He didn't participate in sports but instead played with mechanical toys, put together jigsaw puzzles, built towers and studied nature. At school and home he would ask many questions and because of that everybody thought he was dumb. Once when he was sick in bed, his father Herman, bought him a compass; and Albert asked "Why does the needle point to the north?" His father didn't know the answer. Herman was calm, friendly and had a black mustache. Einstein also had a brot ...
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  • Einstein - 1,135 words
    Of all the scientists to emerge from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries there is one whose name is known by almost every person in the world. While most of these people do not understand his work, everyone knows that his impact on the world of science is amazing. Many people have heard of Albert Einsteins General Theory of relativity, but not many people know of his life that led him to discover what scientists have called, The greatest single achievement of human thought. Einstein was born in Ulm, Germany on March 14, 1874. Before he was a year old his family had moved to Munich where young Alberts father, Hermann Einstein, and uncle set up a small electro-chemical business. He was fort ...
    Related: albert einstein, einstein, world war ii, united states, failing
  • Old Man In The Sea - 391 words
    AUTHOR The Old Man and the Sea was written by Ernest Hemingway who was born July 21, 1899, in Oak Park, Illinois. He later died of suicide in 1961 in Idaho. This book was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1953, and Hemingway won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1954. He was an ambulance driver in World War I and wrote many major works. Santiago, the main character, was a wise old Cuban fisherman who was very experienced in the ways of the sea. Despite his age he had young eyes and great determination to catch the Marlin. Santiago had to survive much pain and loneliness to capture the Marlin The Marlin was eighteen feet long and purple with stripes on his side. This fish eventually became Santiag ...
    Related: pulitzer prize, main character, nobel prize, loneliness
  • Beloved - 338 words
    One of the most famous and loved men on the allied power side was Winston Churchill. Winston Churchills full name was Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill. He was born at Blenheim Palace in Oxfordshire, England on November 30, 1874. Churchill was the oldest son. His father was Lord Randolph Churchill and Winston, like his father, was British. Mr. Churchill was a statesman, a soldier, an author, and a journalist but the one job that he did best and was most important was Prime Minister. A Prime Minister was very responsible for war aspects, or things that go on during the war. Churchill, being Prime Minister in 1940, was good for England because he was a very confident person so he kept his peop ...
    Related: beloved, london england, united states congress, states congress, prize
  • Hemmingway - 2,570 words
    "You really ought to read more books - you know, those things that look like This is a paper about Ernest Hemingway's short stories The Snows of Kilimanjaro (1938?), Hills like White Elephants (1927), Cat in the Rain (1923?), The Killers (1927) and A Clean Well-Lighted Place (1933). However, to understand Hemingway and his short stories I find it necessary to take a brief look at his life and background first. It is not easy to sum up Ernest Hemingway's adventurous life in a few paragraphs, but I've tried to focus on the most important things before I started on the analysis of the five short stories. Ernest Miller Hemingway was born in oak Park, Illinois, July 21st 1899, and committed suici ...
    Related: hemmingway, hills like white elephants, red cross, ernest hemingway, apparently
  • Hemmingway - 2,570 words
    "You really ought to read more books - you know, those things that look like This is a paper about Ernest Hemingway's short stories The Snows of Kilimanjaro (1938?), Hills like White Elephants (1927), Cat in the Rain (1923?), The Killers (1927) and A Clean Well-Lighted Place (1933). However, to understand Hemingway and his short stories I find it necessary to take a brief look at his life and background first. It is not easy to sum up Ernest Hemingway's adventurous life in a few paragraphs, but I've tried to focus on the most important things before I started on the analysis of the five short stories. Ernest Miller Hemingway was born in oak Park, Illinois, July 21st 1899, and committed suici ...
    Related: hemmingway, spanish civil, ernest miller hemingway, nobel prize, stroke
  • The Loman Family And Their Problems Of The Spirit - 1,739 words
    The Loman Family and Their Problems of the Spirit. In his 1950 Nobel Prize acceptance speech, William Faulkner lamented the dearth of problems of the spirit in modern literature and pointed out the importance of the old universal truthslove and honor and pity and pride and compassion and sacrifice in weaving a successful, meaningful story. Faulkner placed these human traits into a genus all their own and labeled it the human heart in conflict with itself. Part of the reason Arthur Millers play Death of a Salesman remains relevant more than fifty years after its first publication is that the story embodies all of Faulkners universal truths. The Loman family is the archetype of the human heart ...
    Related: loman, willy loman, changing world, death of a salesman, exception
  • William Faulkner - 763 words
    Faulkner, William (1897-1962), American novelist, known for his epic portrayal, in some 20 novels, of the tragic conflict between the old and the new South. Faulkner's complex plots and narrative style alienated many readers of his early works, but he was recognized later as one of the greatest American writers. Born in New Albany, Mississippi, Faulkner was raised in nearby Oxford as the oldest of four sons of an old-line southern family. In 1915 he dropped out of high school, which he detested, to work in his grandfather's bank. In World War I (1914-1918) he joined the Royal Canadian Air Force but never saw battle action. Back home in Oxford, he was admitted to the University of Mississippi ...
    Related: faulkner, william faulkner, american short story, microsoft corporation, narrative
  • The Grapes Of Wrath - 1,531 words
    ... ction with the characters of this story, the events themselves reveal Steinbeck's second major area of symbolism. He uses the events to shape his characters, as well as tell his story -- symbolic to the test of mortal life, the very reason we are here, so the Bible teaches us. There are several examples that illustrate how triumphant the human spirit can be in times of trouble and mental fatigue. The trek West itself reveals just how committed the Joad's were to their dreams. They risk everything just to find work and a place to live -- the basics. Each event serves as one more essential hurdle each main character must adapt to in order to fully disclose his/her own symbolism. For instan ...
    Related: grapes of wrath, the grapes of wrath, wrath, historical review, modern fiction
  • Hemingway - 2,852 words
    ... Print this essay New Essays | Popular Essays | Submit an Essay Index: Literature: Hemingway Earnest Hemingway's Works Ernest Miller Hemingway was born on July 21, 1899, in Oak Park, Illinois. His father was the owner of a prosperous real estate business. His father, Dr. Hemingway, imparted to Ernest the importance of appearances, especially in public. Dr. Hemingway invented surgical forceps for which he would not accept money. He believed that one should not profit from something important for the good of mankind. Ernest's father, a man of high ideals, was very strict and censored the books he allowed his children to read. He forbad Ernest's sister from studying ballet for it was coeduca ...
    Related: earnest hemingway, ernest hemingway, ernest miller hemingway, hemingway, main character
  • Modernistic Aspects In Kiplings A Wayside Comedy - 976 words
    Rudyard Kipling was born on December 30, 1865, in Bombay, India. He was sent to England to go to school and returned to India in 1882. He worked as a journalist in Lahore for the Civil and Military Gazette. He also worked on Pioneer in Allahabad later (www.kipling.org). Kipling returned to England in 1889 and met his wife, Carrie Balestier. They moved to the United States in the mid-1890s where he wrote many of his poems. They returned to England in 1896 (www.poetryloverspage.com). Kipling began to be regarded as ?the People?s Laureate,? but he refused most of the honors offered to him, including knighthood, Poet Laureateship, and the Order of Merit (kipling.org). He did accept, however, the ...
    Related: comedy, rudyard kipling, nobel prize, illinois university, sequential
  • Toni Morrison - 1,011 words
    ... e bridged that Morrison sees between sexes, classes, and races (Angelo 1). Morrison states her remorse about the black and white relations a lot of times because black people have always served as a buffer in America to prevent class war and other kinds of conflagrations (Angelo 1). Such interpersonal and intercultural relationships are an explicit focus in Morrisons work.... (Moreland 7). Morrison addresses the differences between people and how those differences have been exploited. She states that discrepancies among people have been exaggerated for both political and economic purposes. One of the main focuses of Morrisons work is the importance of the African Americans upbringing. Mo ...
    Related: morrison, toni, toni morrison, african american culture, paul d
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