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Example research essay topic: Charlotte Perkins Gilman Gilman - 4,829 words

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Charlotte Perkins Gilman? S? The Yellow Wallpaper? Essay, Charlotte Perkins Gilman? S? The Yellow Wallpaper?

Critical Analysis of? The Yellow Wallpaper? Charlotte Perkins Gilman? s? The Yellow Wallpaper? is a detailed account of the author?

s battle with depression and mental illness. Gilman? s state of mental illness and delusion is portrayed in this narrative essay. Through her account of this debilitating illness, the reader is able to relate her behavior and thoughts to that of an insane patient in an asylum.

She exhibits the same type of thought processes and behaviors that are characteristic of this kind of person. In addition, she is constantly treated by those surrounding her as if she were actually in some form of mental hospital. Charlotte Perkins Gilman? s state of depression began after she gave birth to her one and only daughter. She was diagnosed and given a prescription of? rest?

in order to cure her disease (Kennedy 469). Gilman was taken away to a secluded home by her husband in order to obtain such? rest? . However, as it becomes evident to the reader, this?

rest? actually plays a role in furthering Gilman? s mental state. The reader watches as Gilman? s condition worsens as a result of this treatment. It is through her writing and documenting that the reader is able to relate her to a mentally insane being (Kennedy 469).

As is evident to the reader, Gilman is suffering from some sort of mental disorder and / or illness. As is defined by one doctor, disease of the mind is? any medically recognized disorder that may render a defendant incapable of understanding the nature and quality of his or her actions or knowing that those actions were wrong? (Rogers 221). It is obvious through her actions and thoughts that Gilman does suffer from a disease of the mind. Gilman first shows signs of insanity when she arrives at the old, abandoned home at which she is to begin her? rest? .

The reader gets a first glimpse at her insanity as she constantly jumps from one subject to another. Gilman? s thought process is much like that of an insane being as she begins to let her thoughts run together in a mass of confusion. For example, at the beginning, Gilman is writing about a discussion with her husband, John, when suddenly she skips to a description of the old house: ? But John says if I feel so I shall neglect proper self-control; so I take pains to control myself-before him, at least, and that makes me very tired. I don?

t like our room a bit. I wanted one downstairs? ? (Gilman 470). This sense of confusion throughout the story relays to the reader that Gilman is indeed severely mentally confused and ill. According to several doctors in the medical journal Psychological Assessment, some of the characteristics of mentally ill patients during interpersonal and personal behavior include interruptions and ignoring personal boundaries (Kosson 91).

These characteristics are seen in Gilman? s conversations with herself. Throughout the story, Gilman spends the majority of her time napping and writing in one confined space: a room upstairs, which has been chosen for her by her husband. The reader discovers throughout the story that she is actually locked in this room by her husband and his sister, Jennie.

She is encouraged by them to sleep and take things easy in order to heal herself. In this way, Gilman? s husband and sister-in-law resemble the setting of an insane asylum. A typical description of an insane asylum comes from author Phillippe Panel: ? In lunatic hospitals, as in despotic governments, it is no doubt possible to maintain, by unlimited confinement and barbarous treatment, the appearance of order and loyalty? (Panel 90). However, Gilman again seems to live the life of a person confined in an insane asylum.

The room itself resembles such a place, as it has bars covering the windows and one bed bolted to the floor (Gilman 471). She is locked in this place alone with nothing to do but lie on the bed and create images in the yellow wallpaper that grotesquely decorates the walls. This solitaire environment in which Gilman is confined causes her to convince herself that there is an actual woman inside the wallpaper, fighting to free herself. These delusions and fantasies further prove that she is in a type of mental hospital. Gilman also resembles an insane patient in the way that she constantly creates delusions and hallucinates. She describes in her writing the way in which items seem to come alive.

For example, her main focus is the ragged wallpaper that partially covers the walls surrounding her. Very determined that there is a figure in the paper, she spends night and day trying to discern the patterns in the paper. As she states at one point? This paper looks to me as if it knew what a vicious influence it had!

There is a recurrent spot where the pattern lolls like a broken neck and two bulbous eyes stare at you upside down? (Gilman 472). Gilman? s belief that there is actually something living in the paper also supports that she has a significantly serious mental illness. The manner in which Gilman? s husband and sister-in-law treat her also suggest that she is an insane patient. She is constantly called by demeaning names.

For example, John, her husband, says, What is it little girl? Don? t go walking about like that-you? ll get cold? (Gilman 475).

She is treated as if she is a small child with no thoughts or beliefs of her own-much like patients in an insanity hospital. The height of Gilman? s mentally ill status is displayed in the last portion of the story. Gilman has grown so obsessed with the belief that the woman in the wallpaper is going to escape, that she locks herself in the room in order to catch her: ? I?

ve got a rope up her that even Jennie did not find. If that woman does get out, and tries to get away, I can tie her? (Gilman 480). Gilman then proceeds to lie down on the floor of the room and crawl along the floor. As Dr. Richard J. Goldberg discusses in his book, hallucinations of this type are typical of patients suffering from mental illness (Goldberg 32).

At this point, the reader has been given enough evidence through Gilman? s own writing that she is definitely mentally ill, and that she does in fact resemble an institutionalized human being. Gilman obviously does not know how to make mature judgments for herself. She is not in a stable frame of mind, and thus portrays someone in an insane asylum. Gilman, Charlotte Perkins. ? The Yellow Wallpaper. ?

Literature: an Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, and Drama. Ed. X. J. Kennedy. New York: Longman, 1999. 469 - 481.

Goldberg, Richard, M. D. Diagnosing Disorders of Mood, Thought and Behavior. Medical Examination Publishing: New York, 1981. Kosson, David S. ? A New Method for Assessing the Interpersonal Behavior of Psychopathic Individuals: Preliminary Validation Studies. ?

Psychological Assessment. 9. 1 (1997): 89 pp. 3 May 1997. Panel, Philippe. A Treatise on Insanity. Hafner: New York, 1962. Rogers, Richard. Conducting Insanity Evaluations.

Van Nostrand: New York, 1986. Critical Analysis of? The Yellow Wallpaper? Charlotte Perkins Gilman? s? The Yellow Wallpaper?

is a detailed account of the author? s battle with depression and mental illness. Gilman? s state of mental illness and delusion is portrayed in this narrative essay.

Through her account of this debilitating illness, the reader is able to relate her behavior and thoughts to that of an insane patient in an asylum. She exhibits the same type of thought processes and behaviors that are characteristic of this kind of person. In addition, she is constantly treated by those surrounding her as if she were actually in some form of mental hospital. Charlotte Perkins Gilman?

s state of depression began after she gave birth to her one and only daughter. She was diagnosed and given a prescription of? rest? in order to cure her disease (Kennedy 469). Gilman was taken away to a secluded home by her husband in order to obtain such? rest? .

However, as it becomes evident to the reader, this? rest? actually plays a role in furthering Gilman? s mental state. The reader watches as Gilman? s condition worsens as a result of this treatment.

It is through her writing and documenting that the reader is able to relate her to a mentally insane being (Kennedy 469). As is evident to the reader, Gilman is suffering from some sort of mental disorder and / or illness. As is defined by one doctor, disease of the mind is? any medically recognized disorder that may render a defendant incapable of understanding the nature and quality of his or her actions or knowing that those actions were wrong? (Rogers 221).

It is obvious through her actions and thoughts that Gilman does suffer from a disease of the mind. Gilman first shows signs of insanity when she arrives at the old, abandoned home at which she is to begin her? rest? . The reader gets a first glimpse at her insanity as she constantly jumps from one subject to another. Gilman? s thought process is much like that of an insane being as she begins to let her thoughts run together in a mass of confusion.

For example, at the beginning, Gilman is writing about a discussion with her husband, John, when suddenly she skips to a description of the old house: ? But John says if I feel so I shall neglect proper self-control; so I take pains to control myself-before him, at least, and that makes me very tired. I don? t like our room a bit.

I wanted one downstairs? ? (Gilman 470). This sense of confusion throughout the story relays to the reader that Gilman is indeed severely mentally confused and ill. According to several doctors in the medical journal Psychological Assessment, some of the characteristics of mentally ill patients during interpersonal and personal behavior include interruptions and ignoring personal boundaries (Kosson 91). These characteristics are seen in Gilman?

s conversations with herself. Throughout the story, Gilman spends the majority of her time napping and writing in one confined space: a room upstairs, which has been chosen for her by her husband. The reader discovers throughout the story that she is actually locked in this room by her husband and his sister, Jennie. She is encouraged by them to sleep and take things easy in order to heal herself. In this way, Gilman?

s husband and sister-in-law resemble the setting of an insane asylum. A typical description of an insane asylum comes from author Phillippe Panel: ? In lunatic hospitals, as in despotic governments, it is no doubt possible to maintain, by unlimited confinement and barbarous treatment, the appearance of order and loyalty? (Panel 90). However, Gilman again seems to live the life of a person confined in an insane asylum. The room itself resembles such a place, as it has bars covering the windows and one bed bolted to the floor (Gilman 471). She is locked in this place alone with nothing to do but lie on the bed and create images in the yellow wallpaper that grotesquely decorates the walls.

This solitaire environment in which Gilman is confined causes her to convince herself that there is an actual woman inside the wallpaper, fighting to free herself. These delusions and fantasies further prove that she is in a type of mental hospital. Gilman also resembles an insane patient in the way that she constantly creates delusions and hallucinates. She describes in her writing the way in which items seem to come alive. For example, her main focus is the ragged wallpaper that partially covers the walls surrounding her. Very determined that there is a figure in the paper, she spends night and day trying to discern the patterns in the paper.

As she states at one point? This paper looks to me as if it knew what a vicious influence it had! There is a recurrent spot where the pattern lolls like a broken neck and two bulbous eyes stare at you upside down? (Gilman 472). Gilman? s belief that there is actually something living in the paper also supports that she has a significantly serious mental illness. The manner in which Gilman?

s husband and sister-in-law treat her also suggest that she is an insane patient. She is constantly called by demeaning names. For example, John, her husband, says, What is it little girl? Don?

t go walking about like that-you? ll get cold? (Gilman 475). She is treated as if she is a small child with no thoughts or beliefs of her own-much like patients in an insanity hospital. The height of Gilman? s mentally ill status is displayed in the last portion of the story. Gilman has grown so obsessed with the belief that the woman in the wallpaper is going to escape, that she locks herself in the room in order to catch her: ?

I? ve got a rope up her that even Jennie did not find. If that woman does get out, and tries to get away, I can tie her? (Gilman 480). Gilman then proceeds to lie down on the floor of the room and crawl along the floor.

As Dr. Richard J. Goldberg discusses in his book, hallucinations of this type are typical of patients suffering from mental illness (Goldberg 32). At this point, the reader has been given enough evidence through Gilman?

s own writing that she is definitely mentally ill, and that she does in fact resemble an institutionalized human being. Gilman obviously does not know how to make mature judgments for herself. She is not in a stable frame of mind, and thus portrays someone in an insane asylum. Works Cited Gilman, Charlotte Perkins. ? The Yellow Wallpaper. ? Literature: an Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, and Drama.

Ed. X. J. Kennedy.

New York: Longman, 1999. 469 - 481. Goldberg, Richard, M. D. Diagnosing Disorders of Mood, Thought and Behavior. Medical Examination Publishing: New York, 1981.

Kosson, David S. ? A New Method for Assessing the Interpersonal Behavior of Psychopathic Individuals: Preliminary Validation Studies. ? Psychological Assessment. 9. 1 (1997): 89 pp. 3 May 1997. Panel, Philippe.

A Treatise on Insanity. Hafner: New York, 1962. Rogers, Richard. Conducting Insanity Evaluations. Van Nostrand: New York, 1986. Critical Analysis of?

The Yellow Wallpaper? Charlotte Perkins Gilman? s? The Yellow Wallpaper? is a detailed account of the author? s battle with depression and mental illness.

Gilman? s state of mental illness and delusion is portrayed in this narrative essay. Through her account of this debilitating illness, the reader is able to relate her behavior and thoughts to that of an insane patient in an asylum. She exhibits the same type of thought processes and behaviors that are characteristic of this kind of person. In addition, she is constantly treated by those surrounding her as if she were actually in some form of mental hospital. Charlotte Perkins Gilman?

s state of depression began after she gave birth to her one and only daughter. She was diagnosed and given a prescription of? rest? in order to cure her disease (Kennedy 469). Gilman was taken away to a secluded home by her husband in order to obtain such?

rest? . However, as it becomes evident to the reader, this? rest? actually plays a role in furthering Gilman? s mental state. The reader watches as Gilman?

s condition worsens as a result of this treatment. It is through her writing and documenting that the reader is able to relate her to a mentally insane being (Kennedy 469). As is evident to the reader, Gilman is suffering from some sort of mental disorder and / or illness. As is defined by one doctor, disease of the mind is? any medically recognized disorder that may render a defendant incapable of understanding the nature and quality of his or her actions or knowing that those actions were wrong? (Rogers 221). It is obvious through her actions and thoughts that Gilman does suffer from a disease of the mind.

Gilman first shows signs of insanity when she arrives at the old, abandoned home at which she is to begin her? rest? . The reader gets a first glimpse at her insanity as she constantly jumps from one subject to another. Gilman?

s thought process is much like that of an insane being as she begins to let her thoughts run together in a mass of confusion. For example, at the beginning, Gilman is writing about a discussion with her husband, John, when suddenly she skips to a description of the old house: ? But John says if I feel so I shall neglect proper self-control; so I take pains to control myself-before him, at least, and that makes me very tired. I don? t like our room a bit. I wanted one downstairs? ? (Gilman 470).

This sense of confusion throughout the story relays to the reader that Gilman is indeed severely mentally confused and ill. According to several doctors in the medical journal Psychological Assessment, some of the characteristics of mentally ill patients during interpersonal and personal behavior include interruptions and ignoring personal boundaries (Kosson 91). These characteristics are seen in Gilman? s conversations with herself. Throughout the story, Gilman spends the majority of her time napping and writing in one confined space: a room upstairs, which has been chosen for her by her husband. The reader discovers throughout the story that she is actually locked in this room by her husband and his sister, Jennie.

She is encouraged by them to sleep and take things easy in order to heal herself. In this way, Gilman? s husband and sister-in-law resemble the setting of an insane asylum. A typical description of an insane asylum comes from author Phillippe Panel: ? In lunatic hospitals, as in despotic governments, it is no doubt possible to maintain, by unlimited confinement and barbarous treatment, the appearance of order and loyalty? (Panel 90).

However, Gilman again seems to live the life of a person confined in an insane asylum. The room itself resembles such a place, as it has bars covering the windows and one bed bolted to the floor (Gilman 471). She is locked in this place alone with nothing to do but lie on the bed and create images in the yellow wallpaper that grotesquely decorates the walls. This solitaire environment in which Gilman is confined causes her to convince herself that there is an actual woman inside the wallpaper, fighting to free herself. These delusions and fantasies further prove that she is in a type of mental hospital. Gilman also resembles an insane patient in the way that she constantly creates delusions and hallucinates.

She describes in her writing the way in which items seem to come alive. For example, her main focus is the ragged wallpaper that partially covers the walls surrounding her. Very determined that there is a figure in the paper, she spends night and day trying to discern the patterns in the paper. As she states at one point? This paper looks to me as if it knew what a vicious influence it had! There is a recurrent spot where the pattern lolls like a broken neck and two bulbous eyes stare at you upside down? (Gilman 472).

Gilman? s belief that there is actually something living in the paper also supports that she has a significantly serious mental illness. The manner in which Gilman? s husband and sister-in-law treat her also suggest that she is an insane patient. She is constantly called by demeaning names.

For example, John, her husband, says, What is it little girl? Don? t go walking about like that-you? ll get cold? (Gilman 475). She is treated as if she is a small child with no thoughts or beliefs of her own-much like patients in an insanity hospital. The height of Gilman?

s mentally ill status is displayed in the last portion of the story. Gilman has grown so obsessed with the belief that the woman in the wallpaper is going to escape, that she locks herself in the room in order to catch her: ? I? ve got a rope up her that even Jennie did not find. If that woman does get out, and tries to get away, I can tie her? (Gilman 480). Gilman then proceeds to lie down on the floor of the room and crawl along the floor.

As Dr. Richard J. Goldberg discusses in his book, hallucinations of this type are typical of patients suffering from mental illness (Goldberg 32). At this point, the reader has been given enough evidence through Gilman? s own writing that she is definitely mentally ill, and that she does in fact resemble an institutionalized human being. Gilman obviously does not know how to make mature judgments for herself.

She is not in a stable frame of mind, and thus portrays someone in an insane asylum. Works Cited Gilman, Charlotte Perkins. ? The Yellow Wallpaper. ? Literature: an Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, and Drama. Ed. X.

J. Kennedy. New York: Longman, 1999. 469 - 481. Goldberg, Richard, M. D. Diagnosing Disorders of Mood, Thought and Behavior.

Medical Examination Publishing: New York, 1981. Kosson, David S. ? A New Method for Assessing the Interpersonal Behavior of Psychopathic Individuals: Preliminary Validation Studies. ? Psychological Assessment. 9. 1 (1997): 89 pp. 3 May 1997. Panel, Philippe. A Treatise on Insanity.

Hafner: New York, 1962. Rogers, Richard. Conducting Insanity Evaluations. Van Nostrand: New York, 1986. Critical Analysis of? The Yellow Wallpaper?

Charlotte Perkins Gilman? s? The Yellow Wallpaper? is a detailed account of the author?

s battle with depression and mental illness. Gilman? s state of mental illness and delusion is portrayed in this narrative essay. Through her account of this debilitating illness, the reader is able to relate her behavior and thoughts to that of an insane patient in an asylum. She exhibits the same type of thought processes and behaviors that are characteristic of this kind of person. In addition, she is constantly treated by those surrounding her as if she were actually in some form of mental hospital.

Charlotte Perkins Gilman? s state of depression began after she gave birth to her one and only daughter. She was diagnosed and given a prescription of? rest? in order to cure her disease (Kennedy 469).

Gilman was taken away to a secluded home by her husband in order to obtain such? rest? . However, as it becomes evident to the reader, this? rest? actually plays a role in furthering Gilman? s mental state.

The reader watches as Gilman? s condition worsens as a result of this treatment. It is through her writing and documenting that the reader is able to relate her to a mentally insane being (Kennedy 469). As is evident to the reader, Gilman is suffering from some sort of mental disorder and / or illness. As is defined by one doctor, disease of the mind is?

any medically recognized disorder that may render a defendant incapable of understanding the nature and quality of his or her actions or knowing that those actions were wrong? (Rogers 221). It is obvious through her actions and thoughts that Gilman does suffer from a disease of the mind. Gilman first shows signs of insanity when she arrives at the old, abandoned home at which she is to begin her? rest? .

The reader gets a first glimpse at her insanity as she constantly jumps from one subject to another. Gilman? s thought process is much like that of an insane being as she begins to let her thoughts run together in a mass of confusion. For example, at the beginning, Gilman is writing about a discussion with her husband, John, when suddenly she skips to a description of the old house: ? But John says if I feel so I shall neglect proper self-control; so I take pains to control myself-before him, at least, and that makes me very tired. I don?

t like our room a bit. I wanted one downstairs? ? (Gilman 470). This sense of confusion throughout the story relays to the reader that Gilman is indeed severely mentally confused and ill. According to several doctors in the medical journal Psychological Assessment, some of the characteristics of mentally ill patients during interpersonal and personal behavior include interruptions and ignoring personal boundaries (Kosson 91). These characteristics are seen in Gilman? s conversations with herself.

Throughout the story, Gilman spends the majority of her time napping and writing in one confined space: a room upstairs, which has been chosen for her by her husband. The reader discovers throughout the story that she is actually locked in this room by her husband and his sister, Jennie. She is encouraged by them to sleep and take things easy in order to heal herself. In this way, Gilman? s husband and sister-in-law resemble the setting of an insane asylum. A typical description of an insane asylum comes from author Phillippe Panel: ?

In lunatic hospitals, as in despotic governments, it is no doubt possible to maintain, by unlimited confinement and barbarous treatment, the appearance of order and loyalty? (Panel 90). However, Gilman again seems to live the life of a person confined in an insane asylum. The room itself resembles such a place, as it has bars covering the windows and one bed bolted to the floor (Gilman 471). She is locked in this place alone with nothing to do but lie on the bed and create images in the yellow wallpaper that grotesquely decorates the walls. This solitaire environment in which Gilman is confined causes her to convince herself that there is an actual woman inside the wallpaper, fighting to free herself. These delusions and fantasies further prove that she is in a type of mental hospital.

Gilman also resembles an insane patient in the way that she constantly creates delusions and hallucinates. She describes in her writing the way in which items seem to come alive. For example, her main focus is the ragged wallpaper that partially covers the walls surrounding her. Very determined that there is a figure in the paper, she spends night and day trying to discern the patterns in the paper. As she states at one point? This paper looks to me as if it knew what a vicious influence it had!

There is a recurrent spot where the pattern lolls like a broken neck and two bulbous eyes stare at you upside down? (Gilman 472). Gilman? s belief that there is actually something living in the paper also supports that she has a significantly serious mental illness. The manner in which Gilman? s husband and sister-in-law treat her also suggest that she is an insane patient.

She is constantly called by demeaning names. For example, John, her husband, says, What is it little girl? Don? t go walking about like that-you?

ll get cold? (Gilman 475). She is treated as if she is a small child with no thoughts or beliefs of her own-much like patients in an insanity hospital. The height of Gilman? s mentally ill status is displayed in the last portion of the story. Gilman has grown so obsessed with the belief that the woman in the wallpaper is going to escape, that she locks herself in the room in order to catch her: ? I?

ve got a rope up her that even Jennie did not find. If that woman does get out, and tries to get away, I can tie her? (Gilman 480). Gilman then proceeds to lie down on the floor of the room and crawl along the floor. As Dr. Richard J.

Goldberg discusses in his book, hallucinations of this type are typical of patients suffering from mental illness (Goldberg 32). At this point, the reader has been given enough evidence through Gilman? s own writing that she is definitely mentally ill, and that she does in fact resemble an institutionalized human being. Gilman obviously does not know how to make mature judgments for herself.

She is not in a stable frame of mind, and thus portrays someone in an insane asylum. Works Cited Gilman, Charlotte Perkins. ? The Yellow Wallpaper. ? Literature: an Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, and Drama.

Ed. X. J. Kennedy. New York: Longman, 1999. 469 - 481.

Goldberg, Richard, M. D. Diagnosing Disorders of Mood, Thought and Behavior. Medical Examination Publishing: New York, 1981. Kosson, David S. ? A New Method for Assessing the Interpersonal Behavior of Psychopathic Individuals: Preliminary Validation Studies. ?

Psychological Assessment. 9. 1 (1997): 89 pp. 3 May 1997. Panel, Philippe. A Treatise on Insanity. Hafner: New York, 1962.

Rogers, Richard. Conducting Insanity Evaluations. Van Nostrand: New York, 1986.


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