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Free research essays on topics related to: brilliance

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  • Edison And His Brilliance - 2,429 words
    Thomas A. Edison earned his reputation as one of America's greatest inventors and heroes. Full of innovation, ingenuity, and enterprise, Edison "embodie[d] much of what Americans have felt was positive about the national experience. " Edison can put claim to 1093 US patents in addition to thousands more international patents. His works include such major contributions as advancements in telegraphy, the phonograph, a perfected nickel-iron-alkaline battery, and the first commercially successful incandescent lighting system. As shown by his many patents, Edison not only contributed innovative technologies to society, but he was also a successful entrepreneur. Edison's success with the incandesc ...
    Related: alva edison, brilliance, edison, thomas alva edison, school teacher
  • Edison And His Brilliance - 2,289 words
    ... alligraphy or poetry, which he recorded with his notes. To limit distractions and noise from big cities, Edison conceived the idea of "invention factories." By keeping a well-stocked laboratory, Edison was able to provide the proper work environment for his employees and assistants. By having a chemistry lab, machine shop, and brilliant group under one roof, Edison was able to produce hundreds of inventions at his laboratory. Edison's core group of handpicked assistants included "university-educated men specially chosen because of their expertise in fields in which Edison felt himself to be deficient. " From his work, Edison formed intimate relationships with Charles Batchelor, his chief ...
    Related: alva edison, brilliance, edison, thomas alva edison, thomas edison
  • Kerouac A Failure In His Own Eyes - 1,302 words
    Jack Kerouac was the spark that started the flame of the Beat Generation though, through his own eyes, he felt like a failure. Jack keyed the term beat generation in a conversation with John Clellon Holmes, another of the beat generation poets, in 1948 (). The Beat Generation might not have happened without the help of Jack. What formed him into the blunt writer that he was, was his loving family, the death of his brother, movies, college, and newfound friends. Jack Kerouac, baptized Jean Louis Lebris de Kerouac, was born to Lou and Gabrielle Ange LEvesque on March 12, 1992 in Lowell, Massachusetts. Jack had two older siblings: brother Gerard, five years older than [whom he looked up to], an ...
    Related: jack kerouac, kerouac, on the road, william burroughs, apartment
  • Maxfield Parrish - 868 words
    Maxfield Parrish, born Frederick Parrish, was one of the greatest illustrators of his time, ranking among top artists Van Gogh and Paul Czanne. From his day of birth July 25th 1870 in Philadelphia, to the day he died in 1966 at the age of 95 in Cornish, Parrish lived a full wealthy life without many disappointments or sorrows in what was called the Golden Age of Illustration. Parrishs works will be forever remembered as enchanting realistic paintings of fantasy and romance that hung in the homes of 1 out of 4 Americans in the 1920s. Many factors contribute to this artists success. One of the most important factors was his use of Dynamic Symmetry, a design theory based on geometric harmony an ...
    Related: parrish, hot springs, role model, historical research, protein
  • Lord Of The Flies - 388 words
    In William Goldings novel The Lord of the Flies, Piggys helplessness and superior intellect lead to his tragic death. Piggy is an outsider. He manages, for a time, to have some influence on the group through Ralph, who recognizes his brilliance and puts into effect several of his suggestions. But, the boys are quick to ridicule him for his fatness, asthma, and lack of physical skill. As an orphan brought up under the care of an aunt, he has developed into a sissy. He cannot do anything for himself, whether it be to gather fruit, blow the conch shell, or build huts. He always tries to hide when the other boys are involved in manual labor. Further, he makes the mistake of pressing too hard for ...
    Related: flies, lord of the flies, personal information, freely, jack
  • Ac Pigou - 1,050 words
    The Background of Arthur Cecil Pigou Arthur Cecil Pigou, commonly known as A.C. Pigou, is best known today for his work in welfare economics. He was a professor of political economy at Cambridge University from 1908 to 1943. During his life he wrote and had published over twenty books and essays on not only economics, but other subjects as well. Pigou was sometimes a backward person, but he never lacked in his brilliance of economics. Pigou was born in the family home of his mother in 1877 at Ryde, in the Isle of Wight, on the eighteenth of November. He was the eldest son of Clarence and Nora Pigou. His father came from the Huguenot line and his mothers family came from a line that had won f ...
    Related: free press, over time, cambridge university, brilliance, distinction
  • Sir Arthur Conan Doyles Influence On Twentieth Century Detective Literature - 1,506 words
    There are many different books, in many different genres. There are horror novels, love stories, suspenseful books, and detective stories. The detective story's evolution has been a long and eventful process. The man responsible for the biggest leap in the detective story was Arthur Conan Doyle. He gave the world Sherlock Holmes, who could be considered the greatest investigator in detective story history. Holmes was unique in detective story history. "... The reader's interest is captivated not only by the detective's "unique methods," but to perhaps to even a greater degree by "the singular personality of this remarkable man" (Sayers 10). Doyle also gave the world Dr. Watson, Holmes' sidek ...
    Related: arthur, arthur conan, arthur conan doyle, conan, conan doyle, detective, twentieth
  • The Lottery - 794 words
    In many stories, settings are constructed to help build the mood and to foreshadow of things to come. "The Lottery" by Shirley Jackson is a story in which the setting sets up the reader to think of positive outcomes. However, this description of the setting foreshadows exactly the opposite of what is to come. In addition, the theme that we learn of at the end leads us to think of where the sanity of some human beings lies. The story begins with the establishment of the setting. To begin, Shirley Jackson tells the reader what time of day and what time of year the story takes place. This is important to get the reader to focus on what a typical day it is in this small town. The time of day is ...
    Related: lottery, the lottery, davy hutchinson, small town, habit
  • An Analysis Of The Indomitable Spirit Of Man In Henry Wadsworth Longfellows Poetry - 1,604 words
    Henry Ford, the automobile magnate, once stated that the "world was built to develop character, and we must learn that the setbacks and grieves which we endure help us in our marching onward (Daily Quotations Network). Man has always struggled with uncontrollable aspects of his environment, but his ability to overcome these seemingly indomitable obstacles has earned recognition from numerous classical writers and poets, including Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. One of the real American Poets of yesterday (Montiero, Preface), Longfellow elaborates on mans perpetual struggle with life and nature in his poetry. In A Psalm of Life, The Village Blacksmith, and The Rainy Day, Longfellow explores many ...
    Related: henry ford, henry wadsworth longfellow, poetry, wadsworth, wadsworth longfellow
  • Beauty - 891 words
    Only a few of my friends share my passion for caving or as it is called in the professional world Spilunking and it is hard to find a time when we are all together and willing to indulge. So one day last spring I decided to explore the newly opened Rimutaka caves just out side the city. I left early Saturday morning while the dew was still forming on the green grass, taking the east highway out of Wellington past the artificial brilliance of the sky scrapers and their fast paced culture into nature. The sun was starting to rise I encountered the beginning of the mountains bathing them in an angel like radiance, which emphasized the peaks and dips of the ranges. In the distance you could just ...
    Related: new zealand, green grass, saturday morning, newly, carved
  • The Fall Of The House Of Usher - 1,213 words
    During the nineteenth century, literary writers were encouraged in transcendentalism. Their main focus was on capturing the spirituality in nature. For example, authors such as Henry Thoreau and Ralph Emerson were dominating the world of poetry and prose with their tales of nature. From Thoreaus journey through the Maine Woods to Emersons Nature, the transcendental ere, was in the main stream. Yet, not all of the nineteenth century writers shared this same viewpoint. As a matter of fact, one writer emerging, who proved to be just as prominent, had a viewpoint in direct opposition of his contemporaries. The great Edgar Allen Poe, though born during the same period and encountered the same inf ...
    Related: fall of the house of usher, roderick usher, usher, annabel lee, nineteenth century
  • How And Why Was Stalin Able To Gain Power - 1,771 words
    There are different interpretations of how and why Stalin was able to gain power, either concentrating on his own actions and abilities, or the situation at the time and the failure of his opponents. It would appear that the success of Stalin was due to both his own strengths and actions in the political arena and the weaknesses displayed by his opponents, in relation to the prevailing circumstances of the time. Stalin was, by opportunism or careful planning, able to gain control of the party machine and use it to his advantage, and use his own political skills to out manoeuvre his opponents, while they often displayed lackluster tactics in a vain attempt to win the support of a party loyal ...
    Related: power over, stalin, communist party, self reliance, formation
  • Christianity In Constantinople - 1,192 words
    The Emperor Constantine I was the sole ruler of the Roman world between 324 and 337 C.E. His reign was likely the most crucial of all the Roman emperors in determining the future course of western civilization. Constantine began the process of making Christianity the religious foundation of Europe. Also, his Constantinople replaced the city of Rome as the center of imperial power. This set the stage for the occurrences of the Middle Ages. His philosophical view of monarchy became the foundation for the concept of the divine right of kings, which prevailed in Medieval Europe. In 324, after his defeat of Licinius, Constantine decided to rename Byzantium after himself and make it a governmental ...
    Related: christianity, constantinople, jesus christ, emperor constantine, institutional
  • Rome - 1,048 words
    In history it is rare to find truly great leadership, but every once in a while someone comes along so charismatic that even his enemies cannot but admire him. Rome in the first century B.C. was replete with statesmen, generals and leaders who to this day are remembered as being among the greatest and most fascinating that ever lived. But there is no doubt as to the most memorable of these. Gaius Julius Caesar lived from 100 to 44 B.C. and though his life began and ended with Rome beset by internal strife and the threat of civil war, he did more than anyone to consolidate the power of Rome and facilitate the rise of the Roman empire. It is true that the political and social climate of Rome h ...
    Related: rome, new york, human history, more ways, republic
  • The Effects Of Romes Expansion - 2,611 words
    Expansion overseas gave Rome the opportunity to strengthen its empire by war; But, as a drawback it resulted in the breakdown of the Republic, as well as its Empire. Expansion Overseas made Rome a mighty empire for a short period of time, until both the Empire and the republic became unstable and eventually broke down. Hooker, author of Roman History in 1996 states: Roman history begins in a small village in central Italy; this unassuming village would grow into a small metropolis, conquer and control all of Italy, southern Europe, the Middle East, and Egypt, and find itself, by the start of what no other people had managed before: the ruled the entire world under a single administration for ...
    Related: expansion, great britain, punic wars, southern europe, consular
  • Russian Czar Peter The Great - 1,028 words
    Peter The Great's Cruelty and It's Effect on His Power Peter the Great's reign over Russia paved the way for Russia's future as a world power. His many reforms and westernization of the country influenced millions and left a lasting legacy. The complexity of Peter is astonishing, his intellectual curiosity, combined with his hasty temper and cruelty caused a tumultuous but successful reign as Tsar. His brilliance as a ruler profoundly effected Russian society but his cruel decisions left an indelible mark on his legacy. He established his absolute power by fiercely putting down rebellions and even in personal relations with his wife and children. His cruelty and anger shown in his decisions ...
    Related: czar, peter, peter the great, russian, western europe
  • Louis Xiv - 527 words
    16381715, king of France (16431715), son and successor of King Louis XIII. After his fathers death his mother, Anne of Austria, was regent for Louis, but the real power was wielded by Annes adviser, Cardinal Mazarin. Louis did not take over the government until Mazarins death (1661). By then France was economically exhausted by the Thirty Years War, by the Fronde, and by fiscal abuses. But the centralizing policies of Richelieu and Mazarin had prepared the ground for Louis, under whom absolute monarchy, based on the theory of divine right, reached its height. Louiss reign can be characterized by the remark attributed to him, Ltat, cest moi [I am the state]. Louis continued the nobilitys exem ...
    Related: king louis, louis, louis xiv, divine right, thirty years war
  • Threads - 1,719 words
    Threads are rather insignificant by themselves. It is when a weaver connects them together that they form a beautiful tapestry. Each thread now contributes to the quality of the tapestry and are bound together by the common picture that form. In a work of literature, each thread is an idea and the common picture is a theme. In Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, each thread is an ironic element of setting, and together, they demonstrate people's tendency to seek shelter from, instead of in, society. Vivid yet ironic descriptions are used by Hawthorne as a weaver uses bright threads to draw more attention to the finer points of the work. Firstly, a melancholy feeling is associated with ...
    Related: hester prynne, masque of the red death, scarlet letter, settlers, anne
  • Steinbeck - 1,682 words
    Steinbeck' s The Pearl was based on a story he had heard during his expedition with a friend to the Gulf of California about a poor Mexican fisherman who found a pearl which he though would guarantee his future happiness, but however it almost destroyed him before he threw it back into the ocean (Astro 62). "While Ricketts idea about the inherent virtues of the simple, natural life serve as a thematic substratum on which Steinbeck builds his parable, the novelist's chief concern in The Pearl is with how man's failure to "participate" in "the region inward adjusts" can lead to complete personal and social disintegration" (Astro 66). "Man himself appears, becomes, or emerges as good or evil be ...
    Related: john steinbeck, steinbeck, wrath steinbeck, good and evil, modern world
  • Rap - 1,440 words
    In this day in age rap has changed in so many more ways then one. From its start in the 80s on the East Coast, to its explosion and transformation on the West Coast. Today RAP has earned itself a first name, and as you all may know its gangster RAP. Gangster Rap today has become a way of life for many fans. Often being misunderstood gangster Rappers have been blamed for glorifying the gangster way of life. Gangster Rappers such as Snoop Dog, 2Pac, Ice T, Ice Cube and the Geto Boyz have been harassed time and time again by critics, for there explicit lyrics and glorified way of rapping about there lives as gangsters. Many times being at the wrong place at the wrong time often proves critics r ...
    Related: public enemy, american civil, civil rights movement, ball
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