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Free research essays on topics related to: saint

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  • Saint Catherine Of Alexandria - 1,954 words
    "Do anything you have a mind to do! You will find me prepared to bear whatever it is!" she retorted boldly when faced with her death by beheading. During the fourth century, an inspiring legend was born. Supposedly, a young woman by the name of Catherine lived eighteen years in the Egyptian city of Alexandria. When challenged according to matters of her faith, she firmly held her ground. She converted hundreds of people that served her enemy, Maxentius, to Christianity. Proving that she was, in fact, a holy woman ordained by God, she summoned the help of her Lord when faced with adversity, and miracles were witnessed. In this day and age, we have come to the realization that many of these ph ...
    Related: alexandria, catherine, saint, saint catherine, lives of the saints
  • Saint Teresa Of Avila - 635 words
    The selection The Raptures of St. Avila that appears here concerns St. Teresas visions of Jesus and angels. She describes her visions very carefully in this chapter, saying that at first she was able to see only the hands of Jesus, than later his face, and eventually his body. She goes into great detail that she saw his human form as resurrected and that sometimes Jesus showed her his wounds. Sometimes she saw Jesus appearing with a crown of thorns and sometimes bearing the cross. These visions normally disturbed her confessors, some of whom were convinced that she was being deceived by the devil. Part of the teaching of the Carmelites insisted on the union of the individual with God. The vi ...
    Related: avila, saint, teresa, spiritual life, religious life
  • Saint Thomas Aquinas - 858 words
    Saint Thomas Aquinas was a philosopher, theologian, Doctor of the Catholic Church, and is the patron saint of Catholic Universities, colleges, and schools. He was born in Rocca Secca, Italy, in 1225 and was born into a wealthy family. He even was related to the kings of Aragon, Castile, and France. His journey into Catholic beliefs seemed predestined, for he was told when he was a young child that he would become a friar and no one would be equal to him. He started his questioning of faith and religion when he was a youngster, frequently asking his teachers, What is God? Saint Thomas was a panentheist, meaning that he arrives through logical argument at the conclusion that God must be presen ...
    Related: aquinas, saint, saint thomas, saint thomas aquinas, thomas aquinas
  • The Story Of Saint Catherine Laboure - 1,201 words
    Saint Catherine personally worked no miracles, nor did she practice externally heroic charity like other great saints. She sprang from upper middle class parents among the meadows and vineyards of Burgundy, France. Her father was an educated man and an excellent farmer living in the village of Fain-les-Moutiers not far from DiJon. Her sanctity consists in half a century of faithful service as a simple Daughter of Charity. Catherine was born of Peter and Louise Laboure on May 2, 1806. She was the ninth child of a family of eleven. The day after her birth she was baptized on the feast of the Finding of The True Cross. Even the feast of Catherine's baptism was prophetic, because Catherine was t ...
    Related: catherine, saint, saint catherine, holy communion, true cross
  • Rasputin: The Saint Who Sinned - 1,032 words
    It's good to know that if I act strangely enough, society will take full responsibility for me." Ashleigh Brilliant may have subconsciously considered the effect that society has on us all and how wound up we can all get into our lives, our beliefs, and maybe even our visions. Our visions are the most important thing to all of us and one day may get us into the most excellent position or the most hideous position. We always chose to believe what we want to believe no matter what the public tells us. Perhaps they wrapped Grigorii Yefemovich Rasputin up in life and society when he claimed to have a vision of Virgin Mary. At that point he was placed in a most excellent position, but remember we ...
    Related: saint, virgin mary, early life, guardian angel, nineteen
  • The Legend Of Saint Joan Of Arc - 1,709 words
    Bernard Shaws famous play Saint Joan recalls the legend of a young girl who leads her nation to an improbable victory against the English. Joan of Arc has since become a role model for girls and women everywhere as a woman who conquered seemingly indomitable odds in a world of men. But one must wonder: Would the legend of Saint Joan have the magnificence that it does had Joan not been burned when she was? Is the grandeur of the story of Joan of Arc found in her life or in her death? The first step to learning the answer is by understanding the French and English opinions of Joan. When Joan defeats the English at Orleans, she earns the respect of her French peers as a competent general and an ...
    Related: joan, joan of arc, legend, saint, saint joan
  • Kerouac And Tyler, On The Road And Saint Maybe - 1,033 words
    Wikipedia encyclopedia suggests the word experience may refer (somewhat ambiguously) both to mentally unprocessed immediately-perceived events as well as to the purported wisdom gained in subsequent reflection on those events or interpretation of them. Most wisdom-experience accumulates over a period of time, though one can also experience (and gain general wisdom-experience from) a single specific momentary event. In novels On the Road and Saint Maybe, by Jack Kerouac and Anne Tyler, the authors stress upon life as a set of experiences and how these builds a person. Utterly and completely carefree are the characters, blowing and twisting on the maelstrom of their whims, each lunging twinge ...
    Related: jack kerouac, kerouac, on the road, saint, dean moriarty
  • Kerouac And Tyler, On The Road And Saint Maybe - 1,043 words
    ... ound the corner of Seventh Street. Anne Tyler in her novel, Saint Maybe, shows ordinary people and their ordinary lives. She displays the fact that people in this world are only human and are hence bound to make mistakes, yet they struggle to survive with the attempt to work out the problems they face in relationships and communication. Saint Maybe is an involving story, played out over many years, with appealing characters that grow and evolve. It also provokes thoughts about so many things: religion, redemption, the randomness of life, but above all, the nature of family and how it too affects the course of life. The journey of the seventeen-year-old protagonist, Ian Bedloe, begins whe ...
    Related: kerouac, on the road, saint, anne tyler, human communication
  • The Life And Times Of French Saint And Heroine Joan Of Arc - 1,215 words
    Joan of Arc, or Jeanne DArc was a French saint and national heroine known as the Maid of Orleans. She was born the third of five children in Domreemy-la-Pucelle, an ancient villenie of Vaucouleurs, on the Meuse River, in Eastern France on January 6, 1412. Joans parents were rich as far as wealth of a Domremy citizen was measured. At the time of Joans birth, the Hundred Years War was in its last quarter and it was hard times for patriotism in France. Her heart was filled with laughter and gaiety, dutiful obedience to her parents and the church, but her heart also held pain of misfortune and war. Joan began to have visions at a young age, most notably those of Saint Michael, Saint Catherine, a ...
    Related: hard times, heroine, joan, joan of arc, saint, saint catherine
  • The Life Of Argentinian Saint Evita Peron - 1,447 words
    Evita Peron, to many Argentines, was a saint. 40,000 of them would write to the pope attesting to her miracles. She was born on May 7, 1919, in Los Toldos, and baptized Maria Eva, but everyone called her Evita. Her father abandoned the family shortly after her birth. In early 1935, the young Evita fled to Buenos Aires. She wanted to be an actress, and in the next few years supported herself with bit parts. She began regular visits to the offices of a movie magazine, talking herself up for mention in its pages. When, in 1939, she was hired as a second-tier actress in a radio company; she discovered a talent for playing heroines in the fantasy world of radio soap opera. This was a period of po ...
    Related: evita, peron, saint, buenos aires, military government
  • The Legend Of Saint Patrick - 491 words
    True history and legend are mixed together when it comes to St. Patrick. It is known that he was born in Scotland and was kidnapped and sold in Ireland as a slave. He became fluent in the Irish language before making his escape to the continent. Eventually he was established as a minister, then priest and finally as a bishop. Pope Celestine then sent him back to Ireland to lecture the gospel. Evidently he was a great traveller, especially in Celtic countries, as innumerable places in Brittany, Cornwall, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland are named after him. It is here that actual history become difficult to separate. Patrick is known all over the world mostly because he is thought to have driven ...
    Related: legend, patrick, saint, saint patrick, irish language
  • Dorothy Day, Saint-worthy? - 948 words
    Almost immediately after her death in 1980 controversy arose about whether Dorothy Day should be canonized a Saint by the Church. Now that the Vatican has approved the late Cardinal John O'Connor's request to consider Dorothy Day's 'cause,' the controversy is being rekindled. After converting, she dedicated her life to New York's poor and immigrants, building hospitality homes that operated much like homeless shelters. Her endeavor grew into the national Catholic Worker movement, a social justice crusade conducted in revolutionary tones new to the church. When she died, a multitude came down to the old dwelling off the Bowery to pay their respects, the way people had come to Catholic Worker ...
    Related: dorothy, social justice, social workers, migrant workers, american
  • The Transatlantic Slave - 2,910 words
    From the 1520s to the 1860s an estimated 11 to 12 million African men, women, and children were forcibly embarked on European vessels for a life of slavery in the Western Hemisphere. Many more Africans were captured or purchased in the interior of the continent but a large number died before reaching the coast. About 9 to 10 million Africans survived the Atlantic crossing to be purchased by planters and traders in the New World, where they worked principally as slave laborers in plantation economies requiring a large workforce. African peoples were transported from numerous coastal outlets from the Senegal River in West Africa and hundreds of trading sites along the coast as far south as Ben ...
    Related: african slave, slave labor, slave ship, slave trade, transatlantic
  • The Transatlantic Slave - 2,865 words
    ... tes often greater than for all other overseas trades combined. Slave mortality usually increased during the last stages of a particularly long passage when there were shortages of food and water. The Atlantic crossing lasted three to five weeks from West African trading sites such as the Gambia, Senegal, and Sierra Leone Rivers. Near the equator, in regions such as the Bights of Benin and Biafra (near present-day Nigeria), the voyage to the Americas took several months. A few French ships transported slaves from Mozambique or Madagascar to the Mascarene Islands in the Indian Ocean and then returned to France via Saint-Domingue in the West Indies, where additional cargoes of captives from ...
    Related: african slave, slave labor, slave market, slave trade, transatlantic
  • Colonialism - 1,934 words
    Colonialism has often spread to areas where it is economically valuable for the colonizer to develop. South America was one of these places. First came the Spanish for gold, then for rubber. As colonization took place two cultures met, thinking they were opposites, but in reality they were very much connected to one another, their histories were now tied together. In considering the question of how Indians have developed their healing practices and spiritual beliefs as a reaction to colonization, there are a number of areas we must explore. First, we will discuss how Indian and white cultures have integrated one another to the point where certain beliefs coexist or blend together. Secondly, ...
    Related: colonialism, economic development, sensory experience, men and women, instinct
  • Raphael - 683 words
    Raphael was an Italian Renaissance painter who is considered one of the greatest and most popular artists of all time. He was born Raffaello Santi or Raffaello Sanzio in Urbino on April 6, 1483. He received his early training in art from his father, the painter, Giovanni Santi. According to many art historians, he also studied with Timoteo Viti at Urbino, executing under his influence a number of works of miniaturelike delicacy and poetic atmosphere, including Apollo and Marsyas and The Knight's Dream. In 1499 he went to Perugia, in Umbria, and became a student and assistant of the painter Perugino. Raphael imitated his master closely; their paintings of this period are executed in styles so ...
    Related: raphael, sistine chapel, santa maria, virgin mary, poetry
  • Michelangelo - 1,473 words
    Michelangelo was pessimistic in his poetry and an optimist in his artwork. Michelangelo's artwork consisted of paintings and sculptures that showed humanity in it's natural state. Michelangelo's poetry was pessimistic in his response to Strazzi even though he was complementing him. Michelangelo's sculpture brought out his optimism. Michelangelo was optimistic in completing The Tomb of Pope Julius II and persevered through it's many revisions trying to complete his vision. Sculpture was Michelangelo's main goal and the love of his life. Since his art portrayed both optimism and pessimism, Michelangelo was in touch with his positive and negative sides, showing that he had a great and stable pe ...
    Related: michelangelo, michelangelo buonarroti, famous works, ludovico ariosto, begun
  • Andy Warhol - 1,693 words
    The pop art movement began in London during the 1950's and then quickly spread throughout nearly all of the industrialized world. Although the artists did have some overlapping styles, pop art focuses more on the subject and less on style, which was left up to each individual artist. The main themes that is evident in all pop art revolves around modern social values. The style in which these values were portrayed varied depending on the culture and artist. Critic Barbara Rose claimed in her review of a Pop Art show that Pop Art, " I wish to disagree with the assumption that pop art is an art style. It is not; these artists are linked only through their subject matter, not through stylistic s ...
    Related: andy, andy warhol, warhol, baby boom, music television
  • Alfred Hitchcocks North By Northwest - 400 words
    Alfred Hitchcocks North by Northwest This movie was pretty interesting. At first, I didnt look forward to completing this assignment, but once I started watching, I was very interested. The dialogue was clever, but the music was a little bold. I would say it was cheesy but that probably isnt the way to say it artistically. I noticed there were strong beats and drums for climatic and intense parts such as the fight scenes. Softer music for the calm, dont-worry-everything-is-safe scenes. I think sound played a major part in the scene were Robert Thornhill(Cary Grant) is out in the field waiting for Mr. Caplin. Waiting for the sound of the cars to get louder, which means they are close brings i ...
    Related: alfred, northwest, cars, confrontation
  • Ayasofya - 5,052 words
    Architecture, the practice of building design and its resulting products; customary usage refers only to those designs and structures that are culturally significant. Architecture is to building as literature is to the printed word. Vitruvius, a 1st-century BC Roman, wrote encyclopedically about architecture, and the English poet Sir Henry Wotton was quoting him in his charmingly phrased dictum: "Well building hath three conditions: Commoditie, Firmenes, and Delight." More prosaically, one would say today that architecture must satisfy its intended uses, must be technically sound, and must convey aesthetic meaning. But the best buildings are often so well constructed that they outlast their ...
    Related: emperor justinian, christian art, city states, imposing, solid
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