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Free research essays on topics related to: philosophical

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  • Philosophical Thought - 1,201 words
    Fulfillment is Gained Through Philosophical Thought The ability to think philosophical is the ability to truly understand and know ones surroundings and everything that influences those surroundings to the degree that that knowledge becomes the ultimate understanding and appreciation of the surroundings without question. With this ultimate understanding, a philosopher is able to appreciate life and live life to a fuller degree than the average person. Unfortunately, becoming a philosopher or even recognizing a philosopher can become difficult. Therefore, in order to live a philosophical life, one must understand what philosophy is and have a clear perception of why they desire a life as a ph ...
    Related: philosophical, personal opinion, societal issues, drawing, eternal
  • A Philosophical Approach To Finding God - 994 words
    The question of Gods existence has been debated through the history of man, with every philosopher from Socrates to Immanuel Kant weighing in on the debate. So great has this topic become that numerous proofs have been invented and utilized to prove or disprove Gods existence. Yet no answer still has been reached, leaving me to wonder if any answer at all is possible. So I will try in this paper to see if it is possible to philosophically prove Gods existence. Before I start the paper there are a few points that must be established. First is a clear definition of Philosophy of Religion, which is the area of philosophy that applies philosophical methods to study a wide variety of religious is ...
    Related: philosophical, gods existence, philosophy of religion, thomas aquinas, assertion
  • A Philosophical Approach To Finding God - 998 words
    ... if the watch sometimes went astray or was seldom right. The purpose of the machine would still be evident, and that it is not relevant for the machine to be perfect to prove that it has a creator. He concludes the watch analogy with the assumption, that no intelligent person would assume that the pieces of the watch were just a random combination of nature. The next concept Paley addresses is the idea of the watch being able to reproduce itself. Just because it can do this does not eliminate the fact that there must be a designer to establish the first in the line. We know that the watch has a designer because it demonstrates an end, a sort of purpose. Therefore there must be some artif ...
    Related: philosophical, thomas aquinas, teleological argument, existence of god, causal
  • A Philosophical Approach To Finding God - 1,028 words
    ... needed to ascertain the first causes qualities. The causal argument is only meant to be an important step in proving Gods existence. The main disagreement about the causal argument centers on the infinite series paradox. Aquinas states that to imply an infinite series is not only illogical, it also implies that nothing exists. Yet we know that things do exist, hence the infinite series is wrong. Let me explain a little better, Aquinas reasoned that whenever we take away the cause the effect is sequentially removed. By maintaining that the series is infinite we are denying that the series has a first cause. Like on the alphabet, if you are denying the existence of the first cause, which i ...
    Related: philosophical, existence of god, john locke, john stuart, russell
  • A Philosophical Approach To Finding God - 988 words
    ... ingent argument, the other main form of the cosmological proof. It follows that all around us we perceive contingent beings, by contingent we mean beings that might not have existed. The universe could be conceived without these contingent objects. We can properly explain contingent beings around us only by tracing them back to some necessary being. Therefore the existence of a contingent being implies the existence of a necessary cause. To Kant this form of the argument commits the same error as the Ontological, regarding existence as an attribute or characteristic. Yet philosophers like Farther Coplesten refute Kantian criticism and assert that existence is a characteristic. Yet it is ...
    Related: philosophical, religious faith, scientific evidence, religious experience, assassinated
  • Philosophical And Historical Foundations Of American Politics - 585 words
    The Founding Father's views on government were influenced by both the classical republican and the natural rights philosophers. The two groups of philosophers held very different views on how a government should run. The classical republicans believed that the individual should sacrifice his or her personal freedoms in order to gain the greater good. The natural rights philosophers, on the other hand, held that a person's individual freedoms out to be preserved at all costs. The two greatest examples of historical precedent in republican government were the ancient Greek and Roman civilizations, which both gave the people a great deal of power in the government by allowing them a voice. The ...
    Related: american, american politics, philosophical, founding father, different views
  • Equality To All - 2,176 words
    The question has been raised: who is in control of curriculum in our school? Not just the choosing of the precise books, but who is in charge of the contents of the books that curriculum directors can choose from? Once the answers to these questions are found, what should be done if they point to one group? So many problems in the United States have arisen when the people discover that one group is violating the peoples rights in some way by not allowing others power, that it would be logical to conclude that it would be perceived by many to be unfair if it is found that one interest group chooses what all American children learn, especially if that interest group is furthering their own int ...
    Related: united states, webster dictionary, sociological theory, notable, merriam
  • Equality To All - 2,112 words
    ... religious goal over 2,000 years ago in the Christian Scriptures. Bergman states, "Incidentally, the source of the belief in the equality of man is the Bible, few ancient books espouse this concept, and it is foreign to most non-Christian peoples (6)." Since these concepts are biblical in origin, why are the students not told this? What about the fact that abortion, homosexuality and fornication are talked about in school, but teachers are not allowed to discuss the religious side of the issue, only the side deemed non-religious? Though the public schools are teaching a type of religion, obviously, the students are not informed about it; in fact, the topic of religion is not deemed import ...
    Related: public school system, annotated bibliography, religious belief, orientation, catholicism
  • All Quiet On The Westren Front - 5,671 words
    ... by comparison. In many ways, the bond forged between soldiers in trench warfare is the only romanticized element to Remarque's novel.All Quiet on the Western Front - Chapter 6SummaryThe Second Company returns to the front two days early. On their way, they pass a shelled schoolhouse. Fresh coffins are piled by the dozens next to it. They make jokes to distance themselves from the unpleasant knowledge that the coffins were made for them. At the front, they listen to the enemy transports and guns. They detect that the enemy is bringing troops to the front, and they can hear that the English have strengthened their artillery. The men are disheartened by this knowledge as well as the fact t ...
    Related: all quiet on the western front, quiet, gerard duval, psychological disorder, remarque
  • Doc Holliday - 1,745 words
    Doc Holliday: A man in search of normality. John Henry Holliday, perhaps one of the most legendary gunfighters of the west, lived in reality a life built on necessity and simply followed it and made due with the blows that were dealt to him. Born August 14, 1851 to Alice and Henry Holliday, John Henry Holliday entered the world already at a disadvantage with a serious birth defect. The defect known as a cleft palate and a partially cleft lip, basically made suckling his mothers breast impossible. Dr. John S. Holliday, Johns uncle and an accomplished surgeon, delivered John, cleared his air passages, and taught his mother the proper way to feed the him due to the defect. With out the aid and ...
    Related: social behavior, cleft palate, alcohol consumption, safely, philosophical
  • Ben Franklin Biographycritique - 1,621 words
    In his many careers as a printer, moralist, essayist, civic leader, scientist, inventor, statesman, diplomat, and philosopher, for later generations of Americans he became both a spokesman and a model for the national character. He was born in Boston, Massachusetts on Jan. 17, 1706, into a religious Puritan household. His father, Josiah, was a candlemaker and a skillful mechanic. His mother, Abiah Bens parents raised thirteen children--the survivors of Josiahs seventeen children by two wives (#1). Franklin left school at ten years old when he was pressed into his father's trade. At twelve Ben was apprenticed to his half brother James, a printer of The New England Courant. He generally absorb ...
    Related: benjamin franklin, franklin, franklin stove, simple life, wild oats
  • Mark Twain - 1,447 words
    MARK TWAIN a.k.a. Samuel Langhorne Clemens "Mark Twain, which is a pseudonym for Samuel Langhorne Clemens, was born in 1835, and died in 1910. He was an american writer and humorist. Maybe one of the reasons Twain will be remembered is because his writings contained morals and positive views. Because Twain's writing is so descriptive, people look to his books for realistic interpretations of places, for his memorable characters, and his ability to describe his hatred for hypocrisy and oppression. HE believed he could write. Most authors relied on other people and what they said, but because Twain was so solitary, he made himself so successful. 1" "When he was younger, his family moved. When ...
    Related: mark twain, twain, public school, american literature, steamboat
  • Nicolas Poussin And Roman Influences - 1,366 words
    ... than into it. This is because the forms in the painting work together on the surface as a wave of light and shadow that contributes to the movement of the eye and evokes a sense of time and space. The scenes of his paintings are arbitrarily cut out of a larger context rather than composed with a distinctive compositionally framed effect (Russel, 1969) Poussin's style, while incorporating some aspects of the Baroque sensibilities, was well labeled French Classicism. To distinguish his style, however, as merely classicism would be to oversimplify his work and indeed the work of the period itself. French Classicism, while mostly classical in nature, embodies stylistic tendencies from many ...
    Related: roman art, roman culture, subject matter, famous works, russel
  • Bruce Lee - 1,309 words
    Christian Estrada March 22, 1996 Literature-07 Biography Report Bruce Lee Introduction Bruce Lee was born in the Chinese year of the dragon, in the hour of the dragon on November 27, 1940. From the beginning, it was obvious he was a remarkable and unique child with tremendous energy. His mother named him Lee Jun Fan, which meant "return again." She felt he would return to the United States where he was born while his parents were on tour with the Cantonese opera. A nurse suggested he be called Bruce as an American name for him. Childhood Bruce Lee was born in San Francisco at the Jackson Street Hospital in Chinatown. When he and his family returned to Hong Kong in 1941, he was called Sai Fon ...
    Related: bruce, bruce lee, different ways, hong kong, chinatown
  • Hell And Enslavement In Sartres No Exit - 1,067 words
    Hell and Enslavement. In Sartre's No Exit Sartre, the most famous of the existentialist thinkers, wrote No Exit in 1944. It was first performed in Paris during the Nazi occupation. Sartre was a POW during the occupation, but escaped punishment from the Nazis. There is obviously an overall question pertaining to the play in terms of its relation to the historical period and the atrocities that were taking place in France and all of Europe. Sartre obviously knew of the racist ideology and actions the Nazis were imposing on the world. Therefore, his play is at some level be a reflection of the troubled times in which he lived. The occupying Nazis forces enslaved his nation. Did France feel like ...
    Related: exit, no exit, human understanding, nazi germany, conscious
  • Something Wickid This Way Comes - 3,882 words
    I use processes that are most common among my peers to select my books. I usually have one of my parental units, usually my mom, to go out and look for books. This is the way it happens because up until now I had no mode of transportation. I have faith in my mother to make a good choice; she usually does, for she knows most of my likes and most of my dislikes. This is how its been for a long time, but at least she can pick some pretty interesting books. Three unfamiliar words/unfamiliar usages Alighieri meaning hell or some hellish place Ironmongery heavily tooled, worked, and strangely shaped iron The seller of the lightning rods arrived just ahead of the storm in a green town in Illino ...
    Related: church music, school teacher, playing games, fruit, colorful
  • Sophies World - 1,460 words
    REMARKABLE a whimsical and ingenious mystery novel that also happens to be the history of Philosophy. Jostein Gaarder made his Norwegian literary debut in 1986 with a collection of short stories, followed by two young adult novels. In 1990 he received the Norwegian Literary Critics Award and the Ministry of Cultural and Scientific affairs Literary Prize for his book The Solitaire Mystery. Mr. Gaarder taught high school philosophy for eleven years in Norway, giving him a strong basis for writing Sophies World, his first book to be published in English. After its three-year spot at number one on Norways bestseller list, it has held the same status in Great Britain, Germany, and France also app ...
    Related: different views, united states, alice in wonderland, imagination, simplicity
  • Hitchhikers Guide To The Galaxy - 1,179 words
    To begin with I would like to put the introduction of the book as an beginning: Far out in the uncharted backwaters of the unfashionable end of the western spiral arm of the Galaxy lies a small unregarded Orbiting this at a distance of roughly ninety-two million miles is an utterly insignificant little blue green planet whose ape- descended life forms are so amazingly primitive that they still think digital watches are a pretty neat idea. This planet has - or rather had - a problem, which was this: most of the people on it were unhappy for pretty much of the time. Many solutions were suggested for this problem, but most of these were largely concerned with the movements of small green pieces ...
    Related: galaxy, home care, went wrong, planet earth, noise
  • Tqm Analysis Of Lucent Technologies - 1,427 words
    The following is an attempt to analyze AT&T's use of Total Quality Management throughout its organization. Since AT&T is an elaborately enormous corporation I will focus my study to AT&T Power Systems/Lucent Technologies. This division of AT&T has been the industry standard for excellence since TQM was first introduced to the company. AT&T Power Systems has become one the world's most dynamic companies because of its use of TQM. I will provide a brief description of who AT&T Power Systems is, a description of the events that lead up to its use of TQM, AT&T's TQM philosophy, and how this philosophy was implemented. Finally I will discuss the benefits AT&T Power Systems realized through their ...
    Related: lucent technologies, men and women, communication services, doing business, involvement
  • Japanese Work Ethics Vs American Work Ethics - 2,021 words
    Japanese Work Ethics vs American Ethics "For an American to consider the Japanese from any viewpoint for any reason, it is important for us to remember that they are products of a unique civilization, that their standards and values are the results of several thousand years of powerful religious and metaphysical conditioning that were entirely different from those that molded the character, personality and habits of Westerners" ( De Mente, p.19). To understand the Japanese, it is necessary to have an understanding of their religious and philosophical backgrounds. My research suggests that basic ethical values in Japanese business systems are influenced by three philosophical and religious tr ...
    Related: american, ethics, japanese, japanese company, japanese society, work ethics, work force
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