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Free research essays on topics related to: holy land

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  • Raleighs Quest For Judgement In The Passionate Mans Pilgrimage - 1,269 words
    Sir Walter Raleigh's turbulent life in the British court showed him just how cruel the world of politics could be. When he was imprisoned in a trial that was called a "mockery of justice" (Williams 143), he became very bitter towards the court of England. His anger and opinions were expressed in his writing, and they helped to mold his literary voice. Presumably penned in 1603 upon his imprisonment and sentence of death, The Passionate Man's Pilgrimage addresses the events that brought him to his present condition, as he prepares himself for a much happier life after death. Raleigh constructs this piece using a combination of different metrical and rhythmic patterns to express his defiance o ...
    Related: judgement, passionate, pilgrimage, quest, sir walter raleigh, walter raleigh
  • A Muslims View - 1,162 words
    For decades, the situation in Palestine has been promoted as an "Arab" issue, or a "Palestinian" issue, and Muslims have, by and large, gone along with this charade. Such a belief gas proven fatal as the Zionists have succeeded in further dividing the opposition to their occupation of Palesine, with the inevitable weaknesses that implies. And yet, paradoxiically, with the latest "peace treaties", between themselves and Jordan, and with the Palestinians of Yasser Arafat's Palestine National Authority (sic), the Zionists have brought into the open what should have been obvious all along. Palestine is an Islamic Issue, and Muslims all over the world have a duty to care about what is going on. F ...
    Related: human rights, three musketeers, yasser arafat, kashmir, intention
  • A Historiography Of - 2,581 words
    ... s, meaning a bowl." There are three likely possibilities for what the Grail represented that are supported by evidence: "The Grail as Celtic talisman, as fertility symbol, as Christian relic"28 Despite this, the actual of the Grail and the quest for it has been one of the primary attractions in these legends. The Christian interpretation is that the Grail was originally the cup used at the Last Supper, with which Joseph of Arimathea caught the blood of Christ on the cross. However, Loomis says this is only one of the aspects. In one story of the Grail, Chrestien de Troyes' Conte del Graal, there is no Christian symbolism associated with the Grail. In other parts of this cycle, the Grail ...
    Related: historiography, last supper, green knight, columbia university, similarity
  • St Francis Of Assisi - 1,647 words
    Saint Francis of Assisi Saint Francis of Assisi was born in Assisi Italy in 1182. Francis was originally named Giovanni Francesco Bernardone and never received a formal education. Instead as the son of a wealthy merchant Francis led a worldly and carefree life He found his way into a battle between Assisi and Perugia and was captured and held as a prisoner for over a year While a prisoner Francis developed a severe illness It was during this ilness that Francis decided to alter his way of life When well enough Francis returned to Assisi He performed charities among the less fortunate and restored damaged churches These actions caused Francis father to reject him being a man who put money abo ...
    Related: assisi, francis, saint francis, catholic encyclopedia, prevent violence
  • Crusades - 938 words
    After the death of Charlemagne, king of the Franks, in 814 and the following collapse of his empire, Christian Europe was under attack and on the defensive. The Magyars, nomadic people from Asia, ravaged eastern and central Europe until the 10th century. Around 800, several centuries of Viking raids disrupted life in northern Europe and even threatened Mediterranean cities. Nevertheless, the greatest threat came from the forces of Islam, very militant and victorious in the centuries following the death of their leader, Muhammad, in 632. By the eighth century Islamic forces had conquered North Africa, the eastern shores of the Mediterranean, and most of Spain. Islamic armies established bases ...
    Related: crusades, first crusade, second crusade, central europe, different forms
  • Eleanor Of Aquitaine - 622 words
    Eleanor of Aquitaine was one of the most influential women in the history of Europe, having been a queen to rulers of both France and England, along with having significant political and economic power in her own right. She served as an example to all women, during a period where there was increasing development in the females role in society. Eleanor was a patron of the arts, and she was also a powerful personality, influencing the politics of the day with the help of her sons, and maintaining a certain degree of control over the monarchy even after her marriage to Henry had ended. Eleanor was born in 1122 to Duke William X of Aquitaine. The holdings of her father were equal to those of the ...
    Related: eleanor, house arrest, henry ii, second crusade, reign
  • Crusades - 1,943 words
    In the year of our lord 1095, Pope Urban II started what we know as the Holy Wars or the Crusades. Over the period from 1095-1464, a series of military expeditions were fought to take back the Holy Land, Jerusalem, from the Seldjuk Turks. There were eight crusades which were spurred for many different reasons by many different people that left a lasting effect to the world. These years of bloodshed were led by men of power to bring money, greed, and fame to themselves at the expense of others. Although it brought a lasting uneasiness between the two religions, but trade with the East increased and feudalism became scarce. The crusaders failed to regain the Holy Land, but the Eastern connecti ...
    Related: crusades, first crusade, second crusade, holy roman empire, middle ages
  • Byzantine Architecture - 343 words
    The architecture of the Byzantine Empire was based on the great legacy of Roman formal and technical achievements. Constantinople had been purposely founded as the Christian counterpart and successor to the leadership of the old pagan city of Rome. The new capital was in close contact with the Hellenized East, and the contribution of Eastern culture, though sometimes overstressed, was an important element in the development of its architectural style. The 5th-century basilica of St. John of the Studion, the oldest surviving church in Constantinople, is an early example of Byzantine reliance upon traditional Roman models. The most imposing achievement of Byzantine architecture is the Church o ...
    Related: architecture, byzantine, byzantine architecture, byzantine empire, short history
  • Fuedalism - 722 words
    To combat the Vikings and other invaders, many European rulers enlisted the aid of nobles under system known as feudalism. The nobles pledged their military assistance and their loyalty to the rulers in return for land and protection. The land a noble received was called a manor. Each manor was a self-sufficient estate, which included a manor house, pastures, fields, and a village. Most of those who lived in the manor were serfs, men and women bound to the land by their labor. Serfs were required to work their lords land in exchange for a share of the crops they grew and for protection from attack by outsiders. Feudal society operated under a rigid class system. At top of society was the nob ...
    Related: northern europe, national identity, seljuk turks, heritage, caring
  • Summary British History - 1,484 words
    Britain is an Island and its history has been closely connected to the sea. The seas saved Britain from danger. Strong national sense have been developed by the sea. Britain has not always been an island. The ice age wasnt one cold period. Our first evidence of human life is a few stone tools, dating from 250.000 BC. Britain was hardly habitable until another milder period around 50.000 BC. During this period, a new type of human seemed to have arrived. They look similar to normal people, but they were smaller and had a life span of only thirty years. Around 10.000 BC Britain was peopled by groups of hunters, gatherers and fishers. Around 5.000 BC, Britain has become an island. The first pe ...
    Related: british history, british society, summary, king edward, life expectancy
  • King Arthur - 1,852 words
    ... gends of King Arthur of Britain and his Knights of the Round Table, among the most popular and beloved of all time, originated in the Middle Ages. As they do today, medieval people listened to the accounts of Arthur with fascination and awe. It is certain that popular folktales were told about a hero named Arthur throughout the Celtic parts of the British Isles and France, especially in Wales, Cornwall, and Brittany (Lunt 76). Other stories of chivalry that did not include Arthur existed in this time period as well. Although these stories were not recorded at first, they were known as far away as Italy, where mosaics and carvings depict Arthurian characters. The tales are often mentioned ...
    Related: arthur, king arthur, king phillip, second great, mediterranean sea
  • Mark Twain And Olivia Langdon - 1,367 words
    Have you ever wondered what makes a successful relationship and marriage? Samuel Clemens and Olivia Langdon had a successful, long-lasting relationship. The couples success accounts for their love and completion in marriage. The long-lasting relationship that existed between Mark Twain and Olivia Langdon is due to the fact that they were both truly in love with each other. Olivia Langdon was born in 1835 and died in 1904. She had four children. Her and Samuel Clemens were married for thirty years. Before their marriage, Olivia lived in Elmira New York with her wealthy, intellectual family. She was frail in health all her life. Her frailty was a result of a tragic ice skating accident. A prea ...
    Related: langdon, mark twain, olivia, twain, joan of arc
  • The Speech Of Pope Urban Ii According To Robert Of Rheims - 539 words
    Urbans concept of crusading is defined, according to Robert of Rheims, as getting revenge on those who have killed and sinned. We learn that the themes used to incite war-fever were those that were against the Christian faith and violence, as seen in The First Crusade-Chapter I Pope Urban II at the Council of Clermont, November 27th 1095 #2. The attitude toward Non- Christians was negative, as we learn later. The Pope mentions plenty of incentives to incite this war-fever. There were plenty of themes used to incite war-fever among the Christians. The Persians came to Jerusalem and killed millions of Christians, as the Pope states. The Persians captured the Christians and tortured them severe ...
    Related: pope, pope urban, urban, catholic faith, christian faith
  • Revolutions - 829 words
    Revolution can be defined as radical or rapid change. Revolutions, whether called by that name or not have greatly changed the world. Three revolutions prior to 1700 were the Enlightenment, the Crusades, and the Renaissance. The enlightenment was a movement that sought to shine the light of reason on traditional ideas about government and society. During the Enlightenment, sometimes called the Age of Reason, thinkers fought against superstition, ignorance, intolerance, and tyranny. Enlightenment thinkers promoted goals of material well-being, social justice, and worldly happiness. Their ideas about government and society stood in sharp contrast to the old principles of divine right rule, a r ...
    Related: middle ages, byzantine empire, positive effects, sculpture, asia
  • Chivalry - 858 words
    Chivalry, order of knighthood and, especially, code of knightly behavior that was a feature of the High and later Middle ages in western Europe (Encarta). Having developed out of the lofty and pious ideals of the Crusades, chivalry encouraged high personal values and well-manicured behavior. Loyalty to one's lord, valor, honesty, humbleness, faith in god, and respect and reverence for women were foremost in the code of Knightly conduct of the Medieval ages. It flourished in the 13th century and eventually merged into the Renaissance idea of the gentleman in the 16th century (Encarta). In the 12th century the term chevalier (horseman) acquired a connotation of honor, and the English term knig ...
    Related: chivalry, new york, personal values, primary role, courtly
  • Chaim - 1,295 words
    Israel and the Future of a Palestinian State Israel and the Future of a Palestinian State Introduction: Video - A Search For Solid Ground I. The Palestinians claims to the region A. Brief oral description of Palestinian biblical claims B. Description on how Palestinians lost their land C. Outside influence that shaped today for Palestinians A. A look at the land under Arab conquest B. A look at Arab nationalism and local population C. The British Mandate and its Effects B. Arab Palestine, the Christian Community, and State of Israel C. American and Russias foreign policy C. How much land can the Palestinians identify as a homeland A. A look at the Arab populations leaders B. Other Leaders wi ...
    Related: holy land, fair deal, arab state, palestinians, refuge
  • Samuel Langhorne Clemens - 617 words
    Samuel Langhorne Clemens was born in Florida, Missouri. Shortly after the death of his father in 1847, Samuel ended his brief period of schooling to become a printer's apprentice. Between 1853 and 1857 Clemens worked as a journeyman printer in St. Louis, New York, Philadelphia, Muscatine and Keokuk, Iowa, and in Cincinnati. A series of sketches, "The Snodgrass Letters," signed with the pseudonym Thomas Jefferson Snodgrass, were published in the Keokuk Post in 1856 and 1857. He took a downstream boat, apparently with the intention of going to South America to seek his fortune. During the trip, however, he recalled boyhood memories of the glamour of river life and arranged to become a pilot's ...
    Related: clemens, langhorne clemens, samuel, samuel langhorne clemens, jumping frog
  • Stephen King Biography - 1,166 words
    ... station was going bankrupt. He was appalled. So he drove down to the radio station and he bought it right then and there. The station is WZON and is still on the air right this very minute. King is also in a hard rock band where he sings and plays the guitar. The band, called The Rock Bottom Remainders, puts on many concerts to benefit different charities (Beahm 72-73). Perhaps the most inspiration comes from the numerous towns that King has lived in over his lifetime. For example, the town of Orrington, Maine is the town that King and his wife lived in when they were first married. The town inspired him to write his smash novel Pet Sematary. There was a road, called Route 15, that runs ...
    Related: biography, stephen, stephen king, literary critic, on the road
  • Canterbury Tales - 1,944 words
    In Geoffrey Chaucers The Canterbury Tales, the Pardoner tells a tale which reflects some of his characteristics, but is not consistent with all of his qualities. The Pardoner sells pardons and relics not for the sake of the people he should be trying to save, but for his own monetary gain. The tale he tells is an ironic one, in which three friends set out to locate Death and kill him. However in the end, they just find death. The Pardoner is honest and so is the tale he tells. The three men in The Pardoners Tale are vile, as is the Pardoner. The Pardoner gets what he deserves in the epilogue, just as the three companions do at the end of the tale. The Pardoners Tale reflects the Pardoners ho ...
    Related: canterbury, canterbury tales, the canterbury tales, general prologue, holy land
  • Israeliarab Nationalistic Antagonism Bases For Legitimization - 1,340 words
    A Re-Evaluation of Israel's Actions in the Mid-East Conflict Examination of the situations that created and motivated Israel -------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------ Now it can be told- Western historians are re-examining the troubled 20th century history of Israel and Palestine. Previously published revelations of Israel's military strength and aggressive operations during the 1948 Israeli-Arab war remained confined to a select group of historians: (Simha Flapan, The Birth of Israel: Myths and Realities and Ilian Pappe, The Making of the Arab-Israeli Conflict, 1947-1951). Now, the established media is beginning to publish similar information. Washingt ...
    Related: provisional government, defense minister, arab israeli conflict, council, compliance
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