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Free research essays on topics related to: george orwell

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  • George Orwell - 1,486 words
    Imaginative Characteristics in The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. Washington Irving was a well-known American author who lived in the early nineteenth century . As a child he enjoyed spending his time reading, mostly romance and travel books. This led to the critical development of the styles that he used in his stories. These styles were most noticeable through his use of setting, characters, and inventing with his own imagination. It was through these aspects that he best conveyed his thoughts about the American spirit. Irving portrayed the spirit of overcoming fears in such an elaborate and sinister way that he really had an effect on people's lives. He also portrayed the spirit of living life ...
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  • George Orwell The Author And His Times - 1,356 words
    George Orwell: The author and his times George Orwell was a quiet, decent Englishman who passionately hated two things: inequality and political lying. Out of his hatred of inequality came a desire for a society in which class privileges would not exist. This to him was "democratic socialism." His hatred of political lying and his support for socialism led him to denounce the political lie that what was going on in the Soviet Union had anything to do with socialism. As long as people equated the Soviet Union with socialism, he felt, no one could appreciate what democratic socialism might be like. And so, he says, he "thought of exposing the Soviet myth in a story that could be easily underst ...
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  • George Orwell And The English Language - 906 words
    George Orwell, the author of Politics and the English language believes in the traditional style of the English language and that there is a definite correlation between language and action. Orwell highly believes that proper English can be cured by never using slang and never using a long word where a short one will do. It is the citizens moral responsibility to use the English language with clarity. Most important, people must earn the English language and learn to use it the correct way. Orwell would be upset if he saw a modern day newspaper; every article has a flaw. In an article from the Tri Valley Herald titled Pint-size pundits document campaigns, Dole uses a metaphor and slang that ...
    Related: english language, george orwell, orwell, true meaning, make sense
  • George Orwell - 1,096 words
    Animal Farm was written between November 1943 and February 1944, but was not published until August 1945, principally as a result of political objections that arose over the book's attack on Stalin and the Soviet Union. It was turned down by a number of publishers in England (including T.S. Eliot at Faber and Faber) and America. One American publisher rejected it because, he said, Americans were not in the mood for animal stories. Orwell, fearing implicit censorship and convinced of the urgency of his message, considered publishing it himself as a two-shilling pamphlet. Finally, Secker and Warburg agreed to publish it, but it was still held for publication until the end of the war, ostensibl ...
    Related: george orwell, orwell, first edition, t. s. eliot, pamphlet
  • George Orwell - 1,075 words
    ... g (only thirty-five years from its publication, whereas Huxley's and Zamyatin's imagined futures are set hundreds of years away), and second, the disturbing familiarity and plausibility of the world that Orwell constructs. Because the social world of 1984 is not that far removed from the reader's own experience, he becomes involved in a more profound, intimate way than he does in Huxley's remote chrome-and-glass society. Orwell wanted his readers to understand not only the intellectual-theoretical foundations of this future society, but to experience the dull, shabby horror of living in such a world. The first two-thirds of Nineteen Eighty-Four portrays the future as a schizoid, psychoti ...
    Related: george orwell, orwell, atomic bomb, future society, comstock
  • George Orwell - 1,065 words
    Eric Arthur Blair was born in 1903 at Motihari in British-occupied India. While growing up, he attended private schools in Sussex, Wellington and Eaton. He worked at the Imperial Indian Police until 1927 when he went to London to study the poverty stricken. He then moved to Paris where he wrote two lost novels. After he moved back to England he wrote Down and Out in Paris and London, Burmese Days, A Clergyman's Daughter and Keep the Apidistra Flying. He published all four under the pseudonym George Orwell. He then married Eileen O'Shaughnessy and wrote The Road to Wigan Pier. Orwell then joined the Army and fought in the Spanish Civil War. He became a socialist revolutionary and wrote Homage ...
    Related: george orwell, orwell, eric arthur blair, private schools, journalist
  • George Orwell - 1,008 words
    ... empt to tell the truth about war from Orwell's point of view. The genre to which this book belongs was later defined by Orwell as the "Political book...a sort of enlarged pamphlet combining history with political criticism". Orwell came to believe that Homage to Catalonia was the best book he had ever written. During winter in 1938, Orwell wrote his sixth novel Coming Up for Air. It is the discovery of George Bowling, that his boy-hood home has changed like everything else. It is regarded as his best novel (with the exception of Animal Farm and Nineteen Eighty-Four). It illustrates in great detail, the fact that everything peaceful eventually becomes corrupt. After Coming Up for Air, Orw ...
    Related: george orwell, orwell, spanish civil war, real life, greenwood
  • 1984 By George Orwell - 723 words
    In the book "1984" Orwell criticizes totalitarianism of all types and brings up questions concerning social status of citizens and the role of politics in the society. Orwell depicts events, experience, time, memories through different "frames" and symbols to force the reader to think over deeply the message of the novel. Orwell rests his novel on three "pillars" - themes: the paperweight, the ministry's pyramids and Goldstein's book that have ulterior motives unveiled throughout the novel. These symbols seem deferent, but they are closely connected with each other being marks of totalitarianism and personal freedom. The paperweight symbolizes the past for Winston who tries to remember those ...
    Related: 1984, george orwell, orwell, social classes, the bible
  • Comparison Of 1984 By George Orwell To The Actual 1984 - 1,322 words
    Since the onset of the United States, Americans have always viewed the future in two ways; one, as the perfect society with a perfect government, or two, as a communistic hell where free will no longer exists and no one is happy. The novel 1984 by George Orwell is a combination of both theories. On the "bad" side, a communist state exists which is enforced with surveillance technology and loyal patriots. On the "good" side, however, everyone in the society who was born after the hostile takeover, which converted the once democratic government into a communist government, isn't angry about their life, nor do they wish to change any aspect of their life. For the few infidels who exist, it is a ...
    Related: 1984, george orwell, orwell, democratic government, first world countries
  • Critical Analysis Of Themes In George Orwell's "animal Farm" - 1,851 words
    Animal Farm by George Orwell was written in an importune time where communist ideologies were spreading across the globe. As a socialist himself, he despised the idea, as it was not a pure socialist form of government, instead it was a deception of leaders in mansions whilst others suffered outside of their palace walls. Animal Farm is a struggle between the old regime and an ever-changing world that leads to the beginnings of revolutions. It is a reflection of the communist ideologies that propose an equal life for all by taking advantage of uneducated minds and the manipulation of them to gain leadership. Orwell has cleverly taken the human world and portrayed it through the use of animals ...
    Related: character analysis, critical analysis, george orwell, russian revolution, future leaders
  • Critical Analysis Of 1984 By George Orwell - 496 words
    Orwells primary goal in 1984 is to demonstrate the terrifying possibilities of a totalitarian government. The protagonist, Winston, is the looking glass into Orwells horrifying perfect communist society, where all of Winstons worst paranoids and fears are realities. Winstons personality is such that he resists the groupthink pressure that is put upon him, he attempts to gain individuality throughout the plot. This resistance allows the reader to gain a thorough understanding of the Partys harsh oppression. Winstons reflections in the novel give Orwell the opportunity to discuss the deeper issues at work, issues such as the mind control, through propaganda and technology, and the total manipu ...
    Related: 1984, critical analysis, george orwell, orwell, more practical
  • 1984 - The Reflection Of George Orwell - 1,180 words
    "On each landing, opposite the lift shaft, the poster with the enormous face gazed from the wall. It was one of those pictures which are so contrived that the eyes follow you about when you move. BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU, the caption beneath it ran." (Orwell 4 "Nineteen"). George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four presents a negative utopian picture, a society ruled by rigid totalitarianism. The government which Orwell creates in his novel is ruled by an entity known as Big Brother and consists of three branches. The Ministry of Truth, overseeing the distribution of propaganda and other printed materials, the Ministry of War, the millitary unit, and the Ministry of Love, the law enforcement di ...
    Related: 1984, george orwell, orwell, reflection, inner party
  • 1984 - The Reflection Of George Orwell - 1,125 words
    ... displays his understanding of social economic classes through Winston. In Nineteen Eighty-Four, Winston often takes long walks among the Prole section, finding comfort in their masses. Visiting the Chestnut Tree Cafe, Winston takes advantage of the absence of a telescreen which is normally present everywhere, monitoring every move, to speak to an old man about the past. Winston loves the objects of the Proles, and when he finds a glass ornament with a piece of coral inside an antique shop, he buys it even though it is illegal to posess such objects. Renting a small apartment above the shop, he and Julia, his secret and illegal lover, go there often, as there is no telescreen. He enjoys j ...
    Related: 1984, george orwell, orwell, reflection, mass media
  • 1984 - George Orwell's Distressing Novel On The Soviet Union - 576 words
    Eric Arthur Blair was an important English writer that you probably already know by the pseudonym of George Orwell. He wrote quite a few books, but many believe that his more influential ones were "Animal farm" (1944) and "1984" (1948).In those two books he conveyed, metaphorically and not always obviously, what Soviet Russia meant to him. I would like to make some comments about the second book, "1984". That book was written near his death, when he was suffering from tuberculosis, what might have had a lot to do with the gloominess that is one of the essential characteristics of "1984". The story is set in London, in a nightmarish 1984 that for Orwell might well have been a possibility, wri ...
    Related: 1984, george orwell, soviet, soviet russia, soviet union
  • Use Of Language In George Orwell's 1984 - 421 words
    Unlike the assumption, George Orwells 1984 was written in 1948. This was right after World War II, and around the time of the Great Depression. Orwell intended 1984 to be a warning against totalitarian tendencies. Around the time he wrote the novel, humanity as a whole was disintegrating. Drunks and low class people ran society. Orwell was showing people what society would soon come to if they continued their behavior. He showed the ignorance of people at the time, and preached the horrid outcome that could result if people did not change their ways. Orwell is giving a slight extreme but is showing how the government has the capability to deceive people and suppress them if necessary. Orwell ...
    Related: 1984, george orwell, world war ii, after world, assumption
  • George Orwell's Animal Farm Symbolizing Totalitarianism - 305 words
    Totalitarianism a type of government that attempts to assert total control over the lives of its citizens. This form of tyranny was a 20th -century development that was instituted to serve the goal of transforming society according to socialist principals. All previous political institutions and constitutions were relinquished and replaced by new ones. This thought of government was meant to make everyone equal and ironically strips everyone of his or her basic rights. Totalitarianism is expressed in literature, evident in humanity and negatively impacts society. George Orwell is the author of two notorious novels best known for their strong argument against authoritarian rule. He is a beli ...
    Related: animal farm, farm, george orwell, totalitarianism, middle class
  • Animal Farm By George Orwell Character Analysis - 585 words
    In the book Animal Farm by George Orwell the animals have a meeting. The head of the meeting is the Major the farmers old prized white boar. The Major tells the animals on the farm that on a day very so the animals will have a revolution from humans. Three days later the Major dies. Then a few weeks later the animals revolt. They scare the farmer and his family away. The pigs take control of the farms because they had thought themselves to write. So the pigs wrote the ten commandants. A week later the farmer comes back and the hoarse clover kills a stable boy and the pig snowball takes a bullet. The pigs have the farms government like communism there is a ruler and every one has a specific j ...
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  • The World As Portrayed In 1984 By George Orwell - 1,225 words
    DOWN WITH BIG BROTHER, the omnipresent leader of Ingsoc, or English socialism, and the force that has society in a vice of fear and ignorance. It is in George Orwells grim dystopia Nineteen Eighty-Four that these circumstances exist. It was written in 1948 as a warning to where society could be headed. Orwell had experienced war, and had seen the world as it existed then, titling on the ledge of despair, ready to drop and shatter into a thousand pieces. This book is a warning to all, that if the world stayed on its current track, the world of Big Brother, would not be as unlikely as it seems. Orwell stresses the similarity of Oceania to our very own world. Which not only offers reader associ ...
    Related: 1984, brave new world, george orwell, modern world, orwell
  • Analysis Of Utopia In "1984" By George Orwell - 814 words
    The dream of a just society seems to haunt the human imagination. How effectively do the texts you have studied explore the pursuit for a better world? Orwells Nineteen Eighty-Four is a novel of the Utopia genre yet questions the very idea of the human desire for a utopia, presenting itself as a Distopia and a warning to society of today. The society presented by Orwell is one which haunts the every sleeping and waking moment of the people within it, as well as suppressing the human imagination. The constant presence of the telescreens torments Winston to the point where he realises that nothing was your own except the few cubic centimeters inside your skull and that even this is controlled ...
    Related: george orwell, orwell, utopia, english socialism, fundamental rights
  • Metaphors In "animal Farm" By George Orwell - 599 words
    The book I read was entitled, Animal Farm, by George Orwell. It was 136 pages and the copyright was in 1945. The story takes place on a farm like the title tells you. The date and time is unknown. Mr. Jones is the protagonist in Animal Farm. Of course Napoleon is also the major villain, however much more indirectly. Orwell says that at one time Jones was actually a decent master to his animals. In fact, he and his men had taken up the habit of drinking. Old Major reveals his feelings about Jones and his administration when he says, "Man is the only creature that consumes without producing. He does not give milk, he does not lay eggs, he is too weak to pull the plough, and he cannot run fast ...
    Related: george orwell, orwell, animal farm, old major, habit
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